cook, bake, talk 'up a storm' / typing 'up a storm' of nonsense.

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Yul

Senior Member
Canada, French
"After one drink, he proceeded to talk up a storm"

What does "talk up a storm" mean?

Thanks
Yul
 
  • Hi Yul,

    In this case, to 'talk up a storm' means to talk emphatically, with a lot of energy and gesticulation etc. It also means that he is talking non-stop, gabbling on about anything - probably much that he ought not to impart, the drink having lowered his inhibitions!

    I believe it is a rather informal American expression. One could use it in context of old friends meeting after a long time, "they talked up a storm", or seagulls on the beach might "screech up a storm at the sight of a discarded jaffa cake".

    Hope this is of use to you!

    Taika xxx
     

    thinking-fish

    Member
    Chinese
    hi, I came across a phrase "baking up a storm" when I was reading a novel, World Made by Hand.

    The complete paragraph where the phrase appears goes like this:

    “We’re going to roast a whole steer and more than a few hogs,”
    Jack said. “The women are baking up a storm. And the liquor will
    flow.”

    Could someone shed a light on the definition for me? Thanks.

    << Moderator's note: merged with earlier thread. >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Welcome to the forums, thinking-fish, and thank you for providing the name of the novel and the complete sentences. :)

    The phrase "up a storm" is an informal intensifier. It means "a lot" or "very rapidly" or "in great quantities". It can be coupled with just about any transitive verb.
     

    Bântuit

    Senior Member
    Hi,

    "I was about to start an exercise on numbers, my nemesis, when she
    said, “Jack doesn’t have any friends you could meet?”
    Even as I said the words, “I did meet somebody,” I regretted them
    and began typing up a storm of nonsense."

    What does this mean?

    << Moderator's note: Merged with earlier threads. >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    variegatedfoliage

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The "storm" in "a storm of nonsense" is simply an intensified version of "bunch," as in "a bunch of nonsense." The "up" is also an intensifier of "to type" and other verbs, also making them more colloquial.
     

    variegatedfoliage

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You know, here's another thing about "__ing up a storm." Usually you won't see it with "a storm of ___," you'll just see it on its own, like "typing up a storm," which means doing a lot of typing, often quickly and loudly. An example: "My wife has been cooking up a storm these last few days, because we're having guests this weekend."
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I'm guessing that your question actually concerns cooking, not the weather—but without any context, it's difficult to tell. Could you give us a complete sentence, please?
     

    Karen123456

    Senior Member
    Malaysia English
    Thanks, Parla.

    The sentence is "Rob was in the kitchen cooking up a storm." Does the sentence provided by a friend of mine make sense?
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    Cooking up a storm is informal, but not slang.

    The expression up a storm can be added to different activities. He's singing up a storm.
    For me, it's not that it's necessarily wonderful, but that great activity is involved.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    <<Moderator's note: I have merged this with an earlier thread on the same topic.
    Please read from the top. You will see that the use of 'up a storm' as an intensifier is familiar to speakers of AE, though it may not be to speakers of BE. >>
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Thanks, Parla.

    The sentence is "Rob was in the kitchen cooking up a storm."
    Yes, Karen, it's an accepted expression. It means that Rob was very busy in the kitchen, doing a lot of cooking all at once, perhaps preparing a meal for a group of people, and likely had several dishes in various stages of preparation.
     
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