cooked in the tin

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SantaClaus01

Senior Member
Korean
Losses of B vitamins and vitamin C can occur but fat soluble vitamins (A, D, E) are not severely affected. As the food is virtually cooked in the tin, the juices are usually at least as nutritious as the food.


What does "tin" mean in this context? Does it mean "can (as in canned foods)" or "pot or saucepan made of tin"?

I honestly don't know how food can be cooked in the "tin"..
 
  • SantaClaus01

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Nor do I, but that is what it says. More context might help: is this from a reputable scientific source or is it the ramblings of a journalist?
    Actually, it is from a korean book with english reading materials, so it can be both. I'm sad there is no more context than this.

    What do you assume? Do you think it is meant to be "can"? or "pot"?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It must mean the can, we don't call cooking pots and pans 'tin' or 'tins'.

    It does sound odd, I agree. Perhaps it means that the food that comes in tins is virtually cooked?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The traditional canning process involves a lot of heat - to sterilize the food, the can, and to create a seal. While this isn't literally "cooking" in a French cuisine sense, the food in cans is not raw.
     

    SantaClaus01

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thanks a lot everyone! I assumed it to be "can", but I didn't understand the meaning.

    Like Myridon said, it must mean the process involed in making the can. Not literally cooking. Thanks.
     
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