cooked lamb: well-done > medium > ?

MALDINI1976

New Member
French
Hi all,

When you eat beef meat, you have 3 choices
-rare
-medium
-well-done

When you eat lamb meat, you also have 3 choices
-?????????in french , we say rosé and as you know, you can't say rare for lamb meat
-medium
-well-done

Can you tell me the first way to eat lamb?
Don't hesitate to correct me!
Many thanks
 
  • MALDINI1976

    New Member
    French
    Hi Myridon,
    It's really strange because in french, you can't say rare especially when you eat lamb meat...rare is appropriate for beef meat
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    in french , we say rosé and as you know, you can't say rare for lamb meat
    I know nothing of the sort. Although English speakers tend to overcook lamb, it's quite possible to order it "rare," as Myridon says. (or medium rare)

    Obviously, you don't order it "rare" in French (note capitalization) because that's not a French word.
     

    Majorbloodnock

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think the problem may be that the term "rare" is somewhat ambiguous. In the UK, for instance, if you ask for a rare steak, many restaurants will cook your meal to a point that French would call "medium rare" or perhaps even "medium". If you really do want a rare steak in the UK, you're best off emphasising the point by asking for your steak to be "blue" (which I know is a term the French also use, but is so uncommonly used in the UK that it's not misinterpreted).

    Lamb, of course, is not really appropriate for serving blue, so the French would not ask for a "rare" piece of lamb. However, the UK interpretation of "rare" is a perfectly acceptable way of serving lamb, so asking for the meat "rare" is entirely appropriate. However, it's also not uncommon to describe lamb cooked this way as "pink", which is, of course, directly comparable with "rose" in French.

    One other thing to bear in mind is that lamb chops, cutlets or steaks are far more likely to be grilled than fried in the UK (and under a pretty high heat, too), so the meat is probably going to be quite well browned on the outside. Whilst the inside should (according to my tastes) be pink and juicy, it'd be difficult for a French person to honestly describe something like that as "rare".
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    In everyday speech, I would say "pink" for that "slightly pink in the middle" state.

    However, culinarily, I believe the term is "medium rare" for lamb, probably because, generally, people don't like to eat rare lamb because of the texture.

    http://recipehut.homestead.com/LegLamb.html uses "medium rare", "medium" and "well done" to describe cooked lamb.

    http://www.nz.com/new-zealand/guide-book/food/lamb-recipe.aspx uses pink, medium, and well done.

    http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--1285/doneness-of-lamb.asp uses "rare" as well, but advises against it, medium and well done - just like beef.
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    Lamb as cooked in France (and I prefer it so) is normally by English standards almost raw. In England whether it is grilled or roasted it is normally cooked right through and there would not be a choice of how pink it is inside.
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    How interesting, djmc.

    In NZ, lamb would generally be expected to be served slightly pink in the middle. Even in restaurants, I have rarely been asked how I would like my lamb. Although I have no problem with this, sometimes I feel like a more well-cooked hunk of meat. So, sometimes, I'll specify how I want it, if what I want is not "slightly pink".
     

    Toadie

    Senior Member
    English
    It sounds like the problem in translation may be that in French, when ordering, how it's cooked is relative to how everything else may be cooked, while in English, you are specifying as to how you would like something cooked relative to the other acceptable ways to cook that specific meat. (Sorry for the long winded sentence)

    I hope that makes sense...
     
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