Cooking

alex_ln

Senior Member
Polish
Hello

When you have potato you have a device, by dragging the potato on which you can make the potato or tomato,... small pieces. What is that action and what is that simple metal device?

Thanks
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The shape of the small pieces is important! What do they look like? Are they thin and flat? If so, it is a [potato]/[tomato]/[vegetable] slicer.
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    No I dont think if it is a slicer; the one with many holes on it; you can drag potato on it and on the other side you can get small pieces of potato or ...
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    The one with many holes is a potato grater. A smaller version would be a cheese grater, and an even smaller version would be a garlic grater.

    There is one with a blade can be called mandoline if you are being fancy, or potato slicer if you are not.
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    The one with many holes is a potato grater. A smaller version would be a cheese grater, and an even smaller version would be a garlic grater.

    There is one with a blade can be called mandoline if you are being fancy, or potato slicer if you are not.
    Yes exactly grater :) thank you
     

    Crockett

    Senior Member
    US English
    Yes. 'To grate' is correct. This verb, however, can have another meaning as well. For example, "my loud neighbor really grates on my nerves" = "my loud neighbor is extremely obnoxious."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    And the verb is "grate"?
    "I grated the potato and carrot by a grater."
    The verb is grate. And the sentence would be: "I grated the potato and carrot." We automatically assume you used "a grater," so no need to put it in -- in fact, we would consider it incorrect and a reason to smirk. ;)

    Congratulations on 100 posts. :)
     
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