Coordinated noun phrase and subclause: singular or plural verb?

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jhswe

New Member
Swedish
This is what a sentence I'm reading says:

The organisation itself and how it is managed forms an important part of the study.​

This is how I think:

[The organisation itself] and [how it is managed] form an important part of the study.

I.e. like this: [Pete] and [John] are friends.​

Whereas the author seems to have thought:

[The organisation itself and how it is managed] forms an important part of the study.​


Which one is correct? Shouldn't the verb in the first sentence should be conjugated as singular (form)?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's arguable, but I would probably edit it to give it plural agreement. Two things joined by 'and' normally take plural agreement, but one thing joined to another by any other means ('with', 'including', 'as well as') usually doesn't. Two things regared as aspects of the same thing also often take singular agreement. So there's room for choice in that sentence.
     
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