coping with the massive disasters < have inspire/ inspire>

< Previous | Next >

angel8848

Senior Member
Cantonese
Hi, there,

The vast scale of disasters in Japan sadden and worry about the whole world but Japanese's calmness and discipline impress the world so I put this message on my facebook.

'The measures and the spirits, coping with the massive disasters in Japan have inspire many nations and earn respect from people around the world.'

Since I had to make it short and clear, I think I must have made some mistakes there. Would it be better to say, "The measures and the spirts, coping with the massive disasters in Japan, inspire many nations and earn respect from people around the world."

Please help me to make sense of the sentence structure. Thanks a lot for your help.
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    The tense is not a problem (with a slight correction to the first). In both versions, the main part of your sentence is grammatical.

    'The measures and the spirits have inspired many nations and earn respect from people around the world.'

    "The measures and the spirits inspire many nations and earn respect from people around the world."

    The grammatical problem is the middle part, coping with the massive disasters in Japan. "Coping" acts as an adjective here. In your sentence, it describes measures and spirits. The measures may be coping with the disasters. However, it is strange to say that that the spirits are coping with the disasters.

    In general, the combination of "measures and spirits" seems odd.

    Please tell us in other words what you want to say. When we know that, we can help you with the grammatical questions.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I think you'd be better off deleting the commas from your last version: The measures and spirits coping with the massive disasters in Japan inspire many nations and earn respect from people around the world.

    Your sentence is pretty long, but there's nothing wrong with its structure. I thought that starting with "measures and spirits" was unusual. However, being unusual is fine as long as what you said was comprehensible. It was.
     

    angel8848

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Thanks a lot for your correction and explanation. In stead of using 'spirits', would it be better or comprehensible to use ' morale' or attitude?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I don't know, Angel. Pairing "spirits" with "measures" is no more unusual than pairing "measures" with "morale" or "attitude".

    Once again, I don't think there is any crime in being unusual. If you wanted to avoid this, you might try mixing the ideas in a phrase: The spirit of the Japanese in their struggle to cope with...

    That's just a suggestion, however. I don't think I like that version any better than I like yours.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Thanks a lot for your correction and explanation. In stead of using 'spirits', would it be better or comprehensible to use ' morale' or attitude?
    I think there is a problem in describing spirits, morale, or attitude as coping with the disaster. It is the people who cope with the disaster, and the people who have spirits, morale, or attitude. However, you might admire the spirit of the people when they cope with disaster. Or the people's attitude, or the way they maintain their morale.

    That is my opinion, in any case.

    Added: Cross-posted with Owlman.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top