cordon aire

danielxu85

Senior Member
Mandarin Chinese
I wonder if the term "cordon aire" has been accepted into the English language, especially in the UK and US. If not, how would you say this idea in English. I listened to a farewell speech given by Philipe (I am sorry but I don't know her full name), the former ambassador and permanent representative of Romania, in Geneva.

She said the following:
We have taken great pride and pleasure in organizing a variety of public diplomacy events, and we hope that the Romanian hall in this National Assembly, or the statue not far away in cordon aire of Nicolae Titulescu, a Romanian statesman, twice the president of the league of nations and bold visionary, who fought to promote the culture of peace and the spiritualization of borders, have not gone unnoticed.

I assume that "cordon aire" refers to the line that circles the statute of Nicolae Titulescu, but I could not find this word in any English dictionary. If this is not an accepted term in English, how do people talk about the velvet line that sometimes circles statues in English?
 
  • Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    The phrase is not in use in English, and frankly, I'm not sure that it's in use in French, either, since cordon and aire are both nouns. Moreover, I can't find a definition for the phrase online.

    Is there any chance that it could be another phrase, and it was misspelled?
     

    danielxu85

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    Hello Cypherpunk. It might be misspelled, because I don't have a script for that speech. What would you call the velvet line that circles most statues?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Apparently cour d'honneur is used in English, but I've never seen it: I'd call such things a forecourt or courtyard.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Apparently cour d'honneur is used (very sparingly) in English, but I've never seen it: I'd call such things a forecourt or courtyard.
    I can't find it in any English dictionary (I lack access to the big OED; it's not in the Compact OED or the Shorter OED), and most of the web appearances are definitions rather than actual uses. I've not seen it, but will accept that it is used once in a long while. It seems to be considered "foreign" when used.


    1. Attre, Château d' - cour d'honneur, hauts reliefs, Country Life

      This classically simple design by A. Coutant dates from 1909 and replaced the original cour d'honneur (the chief, and usually grandest, entrance court to a ...
      www.jrank.org/gardening/pages/87/Attre-Château-d'.html - Cached
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, it's not in the full OED either (though to be fair it begins with C, so we're looking at a 120-year-old part of the dictionary); all I did was google for it and notice that there are people using it in regular English prose. You're right, it's mainly in reference to French buildings and often a proper name. So only weakly naturalized.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    etb said:
    So only weakly naturalized.
    Thanks for that term!

    In AE parlance, outside of writers about architecture, I suspect it has hired an immigration lawyer and is caught in the painfully slow procedures of OOOhmland Security. :)
     

    danielxu85

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    Wow! Thank you very much pickarooney and everyone else for helping me find the right expression and explain its usage. I am deeply indebted to your kindness!
    Also, I am very pleased to see the script of this audio statement! Many thanks!
     
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