core strength

ViolentFemme

Senior Member
Italian - Italy
Hi everybody!

Natives, I need your help: have you ever heard the following expression?

"core strength"

What does it mean?

Here is the context:
Exercisers are seeking means to gain fitness in general, and have an increased interest in core strength because of its’ relationship to back health, activities of daily living and sports performance.

Thanks!
 
  • Lazzini

    Senior Member
    I think that your question "what does it mean?" is a good one. If "core strength" means anything - I think that the whole sentence means very little - I would think that it might mean the natural strength that one is born with.

    And "its' relationship" is wrong. It should be "its relationship".
     

    ViolentFemme

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    I too have the impression that that sentence doesn't mean much, or that its language is too "domain-specific". But I have to find a sense out of it! Anyway, I think that in that context "core strength" could mean the strength of the chest/torso...
     

    marquess

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Everyone seems to be on the right track. The 'core' of a thing refers to the central internal part of something (eg. an apple) where the centre is the 'fundamental' (as Lazzini says), 'nuclear', or somehow 'vital' part, which everything else comes from. When applied to humans it presumably means the allegorical 'heart' ('core' in Italian) or essence, but not really the actual heart.
    Either the writers are trying to suggest that there is some theoretical central internal part ('nucleo centrale' or whatever they want to call it) to a human being or they just mean some general, overall attribute like 'stamina', 'fitness', in contrast to specific external parts like the back, torso, or shoulders. If the first intention really means anything, it would probably be more or less the second anyway.
     

    TheAmzngTwinWndr

    Senior Member
    United States
    I know I told you this in the post in the English forum but what the hey, I'll write it here too.
    Your core is your abs (core of the body, center). Therefore, your core strength is the strength of your abs/six-pac.
     

    marquess

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    I know I told you this in the post in the English forum but what the hey, I'll write it here too.
    Your core is your abs (core of the body, center). Therefore, your core strength is the strength of your abs/six-pac.
    Interesting idea, but on what authority? Pilates? Can you cite a reference?
     

    pescara

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I know I told you this in the post in the English forum but what the hey, I'll write it here too.
    Your core is your abs (core of the body, center). Therefore, your core strength is the strength of your abs/six-pac.
    I agree with this, although I think core involves more than just the abdominal muscles. It includes the lower back as well. My source for this definition is my personal trainer, who talks about "core strength" often.

    Ciao.
     

    housecameron

    Senior Member
    Italian/ Italy
    Interesting idea, but on what authority? Pilates? Can you cite a reference?
    Hi,
    As regards my previous post about Pilates here is a quote:
    Alla base del metodo Pilates vi è l'utilizzo corretto della respirazione, dei movimenti lenti e controllati e del “nucleo centrale”, cioè la muscolatura addominale e dorsale.
    Not sure whether I can post the link, but you can google it.

    It is also called baricentro or centro.
     

    TheAmzngTwinWndr

    Senior Member
    United States
    Interesting idea, but on what authority? Pilates? Can you cite a reference?

    I've been in sports all my life and had a sports trainer. All my coaches/trainers call sit-ups, crunches, leg lifts, etc. "core exercises". I don't have a citeable authority, just my life experience.


    Also, at least in my experience, "core strength" does not refer to your back. Though it is a good idea to work your back when exercising your abs, "core strength" specifically refers to your abs.
     

    IGetU

    New Member
    italian-Italy
    Hi
    What does "core strengths" mean? and how would you traslate the whole sentence?
    "However, by thinking objectively, candidates can use it to build on their core strengths an ultimately find a job that suits them best."
    The piece talks about how to react to a job rejection.
     

    IGetU

    New Member
    italian-Italy
    "Being rejected after a job interview can severely dent your confidence. Rejection, while not pleasant, can often be viewed as a sign of failure. However, by thinking objectively, candidates can use it to build on their core strengths and ultimately find a job that suits them best"
    Essere rifiutati dopo un colloquio di lavoro può seriamente scalfire la fiducia in te stesso. Il rifiufo, nonostante non sia piacevole, può essere visto come un fallimento. Tuttavia, ragionando obbiettivamente, i candidati possono usarlo per..(?).. e alla fine trovare il lavoro che meglio si addice loro.
    Il senso credo che sia: fare tesoro dell'esperienza negativa e costruirci sopra qualcosa di buono.
     

    IGetU

    New Member
    italian-Italy
    Mi autocito "The piece talks about how to react to a job rejection". In più dalle due righe che ho scritto si capisce benissimo che si parla di come reagire quando non si supera un colloquio di lavoro.
    Comunque l'articolo è tratto dal "the guardian" e si intitola "Didn't get the job? How to survive rejection"
     
    What about "capacità centrali" in this context?
    "Dai nostri risultati emerge che le capacità centrali per una leadership efficiente possono essere predette dall’attaccamento sicuro e ..."
    Forse: "Tuttavia, ragionando obbiettivamente, i candidati possono usarlo per potenziare le loro capacità centrali e alla fine trovare un lavoro che gli sia più adatto".
     
    Last edited:
    I don't know, not being a madrilengua. I was thinking "potenziare" with either "capacità centrali" or "capacità principali". I thought "capacità" was broad enough to mean "strengths" in your context.
    (To be honest, I was hoping that ""che gli sia più adatto" was OK grammatically. Is "gli" OK for "a loro", and is the congiuntivo correct here?)
    I also entertained "competenze".
    I also wondered about "sviluppare" for "build on".
    "...i candidati possono usarlo per sviluppare le loro competenze principali...".
     
    Last edited:

    IGetU

    New Member
    italian-Italy
    Both "Capacità principali" and "capacità centrali" Imho do not fit well here. "Potenziare/rafforzare i punti di forza" maybe fits better.
    To answer your question "accademia della crusca" writes:per riassumere, l'uso di gli in luogo di loro, a loro, a essi e a esse è da considerare senz'altro corretto (Ora vado dai tuoi amici e gli dico che la devono smettere di fare chiasso), tranne che, forse, nel caso di registri altamente formali (Il parroco espresse loro le sue più sentite condoglianze)
     

    MStraf

    Senior Member
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