Coriander leaves bundle or bunch?

Lun-14

Banned
Hindi
Hi,

What do you native speakers call this?

Coriander leaves bundle or coriander leaves bunch?

Sentence: "I bought five bundles/bunches of coriander leaves from a nearby vegetables shop."

Thanks a lot.
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    A bunch/Five bunches of coriander. If I bought the roots I'd specify that, but I only see the leaves or whole plants for sale so everybody knows I mean cut stalks with leaves.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    "I bought five bunches of coriander leaves from a nearby vegetables shop."

    This is a bunch of coriander stems, stalks and leaves. Americans call it something else, can't rememeber what.
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Americans call it cilantro, or less often, coriander. The use of "bunch/es" is the same.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    The picture is of a bunch of cilantro.
    On rare occasions I've seen it in supermarkets labeled "Chinese parsley".
    Coriander is a powdered spice made of ground-up seeds.
     
    I call one of them a bunch or bundle pretty much interchangeably.

    I think probably "coriander" was the main word used for years in cookbooks, referring only to the seeds, but the plant appearing in markets outside of American major coastal cities without a heritage of Latino-Hispanic populations was largely unknown by the "Anglos.":)

    That began to change in the past few decades with the spreading of cultures and the increasing interest in Mexican and Puerto Rican foodstuffs.

    (cross-posted with others)
     
    Last edited:

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The Ngrams are interesting:) Coriander has been around for a long time. In the US cilantro started become common in the 60's while in GB it was not until the 80s that it started and it is still used far less than in the US (caveat about assignment of books to US or GB English). I moved in the mid-70s and had neither tasted nor heard of cilantro until I arrived on the west coast of the US in the early 80s - PS I hate the taste except as a subtle hint (I refer to it as "barf-weed" when it dominates:eek: )
     
    The Ngrams are interesting:) Coriander has been around for a long time. In the US cilantro started become common in the 60's while in GB it was not until the 80s that it started and it is still used far less than in the US (caveat about assignment of books to US or GB English). I moved in the mid-70s and had neither tasted nor heard of cilantro until I arrived on the west coast of the US in the early 80s - PS I hate the taste except as a subtle hint (I refer to it as "barf-weed" when it dominates:eek: )
    (I had a similar experience and only encountered the plant itself when I moved to New York City in 1972, where I found it everywhere, in grocery stores and restaurants. I loved/love it, though.:))
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The OP was concerned with the bunch/bundle question. I'd certainly say bunch.

    I say coriander, but I know there are people who say other things, like Mexican parsley, Chinese parsley, or cilantro.

    The ngrams suggest that bunch of coriander is the most usual way of saying this; that's not to suggest that the other ways are in any way incorrect.
     
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