corner shop (UK) = grocery (US)?

  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    No. In the U.S. small grocery stores have virtually disappeared and have been replaced by supermarkets.

    We do have "convenience stores," that might sell some foodstuffs, but seem to deal primarily in beer, potato chips (BE:Crisps), cigarettes and condoms.
     
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    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    No. In the U.S. small grocery stores have virtually disappeared and have been replaced by supermarkets.

    We do have "convenience stores," that might sell some foodstuffs, but seem to deal primarily in beer, potato chips (BE:Crisps), cigarettes and condoms.

    Not quite, SD. In my immediate neighborhood, here in Manhattan, there are quite a few groceries, selling mostly foodstuffs, as well as beer, potato chips, cigarettes, and often fresh flowers and an occasional newspaper. (Not condoms, which are sold in drugstores.)

    In the main, they style themselves markets ["(Proprietor) Market"] rather than groceries. They're usually family owned and operated.

    I'm really sorry that these neighborhood stores have disappeared from your part of the US.

    (We have supermarkets, as well, of course.)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Perhaps one of our British contributors will describe a corner shop for us. Then we will have some idea of what we are comparing. My impression is that corner stores are much smaller than the grocery stores and supermarkets discussed above, though I may be wrong.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Corner shops (note: NOT corner stores) also sell basic foodstuff - milk, biscuits, some vegetables and meat including bacon and ham. The should also stock tinned (canned) food. Basic toiletry items, newspapers, some magazine and basic stationery. The bigger ones might even have a post office counter for stamps and pension cheques. They are also usually family owned. Many are owned by people originally from South Asia, especially Pakistanis. They also open earlier and stay open later than many other shops.

    They are usually in the corner but not necessarily. :)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I still am not certain about the size of the store. When these stores are smaller and concentrate on foods that are ready to eat along with the items sdgraham mentions above, we call them "convenience stores". Grocery stores and supermarkets would be larger and have a more complete selection of foods to prepare at home as well as other things.

    Figuring out the relationships between names for stores used in different countries is tricky. Here are a few earlier threads, in case anyone is interested:

    C-stores
    Provision store and Grocery store
    Department store, Shopping mall, Convenience store,...
    dairy
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Corner shops are generally fairly small. Here's a stereotypical one on a corner. (Note how it calls itself general store ~ that's actually pretty common.) These are also sometimes called (rather confusingly) convenience stores. I don't remember ever hearing of a convenience shop ... perhaps because it sounds too much like a shop that sells 'conveniences'.
    All the above are mostly found in towns. Though the same shops in villages may call themselves convenience stores, they're more likely to be referred to by the inhabitants as, and to call themselves, the village shop.
    The next stage up in size is the minimarket or mini-supermarket, often found on housing estates where there aren't (strictly speaking) corners.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    To understand the British corner shop, Google "Open all Hours" (including the quotes) and then enjoy the videos. The series may have been a comedy, but the shop is typical of what was a traditional corner shop. You could also look at the various images that the same search provides in Google Images - restrict it to UK only.
     
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