Corny Music - on the 70's & on the 2000's / cheesy, lame, mushy

< Previous | Next >

Lanikai

New Member
Brazil - Portuguese
Guys, I am translating a movie into English
and the character compares too words that mean
the same thing but were used in different periods.
Like "swell" (outdated) and "cool".

In the text I'm translating he is talking about "corny music".
I guess we still use "corny" today. Do you know how
they used to say "corny" music in the 70's or 80's?

Or are people already using another word for "corny"?

Bottomline is I need 2 words anyway: one older,
one more recent. "Corny"can be one of them or not.
Just remember I'm talking about music.

Can anybody help me?
Thank you very much in advance
 
  • Cathy Rose

    Senior Member
    United States English
    "Wack" is the latest urban word for "corny" (at least it was as of January 2008; words change often here) and "dope" is the latest word for "cool."

    "Man, that CD is wack; it's just wannabe rap."

    Is this too recent?
     

    Lanikai

    New Member
    Brazil - Portuguese
    Thank you, Cathy Rose.

    I lthink "wack" is a possibility. (I didn't need suggestions for cool, but thank you anyway!hehe)

    The sentences would be something like:

    They used to say "corny". Now they say "wack".
    I don't thing my music is "wack".


    A 80 year old guy is saying that.
    Does it sound ok?

    Thank you again!
     

    Cathy Rose

    Senior Member
    United States English
    That sounds fine, Lanikai, but I am afraid that wack is too recent if you are looking for a word that was around in the 70s. I'll ask my daughter (she's 34) if you need a different word. Good luck.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I don't think wack quite has the same emphasis as corny. I would suggest cheesy, or possibly tacky. In any case, I think corny is still current, and no other word quite replaces it.
     

    Lanikai

    New Member
    Brazil - Portuguese
    I'm in trouble, guys... I see (by se16teddy) that "corny" and "cheesy" are quite old terms but I know we still use them... Tacky is used today too, although
    I used to think it was only for clothes. Oh, my God, what will I do?
    If you have other suggestions for my sentence (on previous post),
    I'd appreciate it. Thanks anyway for yr help.

    At the moment, the only solution would be corny, cheesy, tacky as the "old word"
    and wack asthe "new word", even if some of you think it's not exactly the same thing.
    I would love to have an "old word" that is not used anymore, but, maybe it doesn't exist.
     

    Macunaíma

    Senior Member
    português, Brasil
    What about crap/crappy as the 'new word'? It's what I hear and read all the time. "Their latest album is just crap/so crappy!"

    Maybe for the 'old word' you don't need one which has fallen out of use completely, Lanikai, but just one which is not so 'in' any more.
     

    Lanikai

    New Member
    Brazil - Portuguese
    Cathy, thanks again, but I think bogus will not do for me here.
    Macunaíma, thanks too. I see you are Brazilian. The words
    are originally in Portuguese ("old word": cafona // "new word": brega).
    Sorry if I violate the rule of "English only", it's just that for Macunaíma
    (or someone outthere, who knows). I will go on in English.

    What about drippy? Or lame? Soppy?
    I'm talking about those cheesy love songs...

    Thank you for your patience, guys.

    ps: I've been to the forum english-portuguese, but still not satisfied with the suggestions.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I'm a bit puzzled by all this, Lanikai. Why the 70s? If the speaker is 80 years old, and he's talking about the music of his youth, wouldn't that be the late 40s and 50s?
     

    djangli

    Member
    English USA
    A 80 year old guy is saying 'wack'- no.
    'Crappy'-good but not necessarily the sentimental fog that corny gives off.
    My vote: 'drippy' for then and ...'corny' now.
     

    Lanikai

    New Member
    Brazil - Portuguese
    Hi, ewie. You see, this is an old Brazilian singer who used to be successful
    in the 70's singing what people usually call corny love songs. This is a documentary about his life - it was made last year. Back in the 70's, we - Brazilians - had a word that meant "corny". Today, people are using another word. I gave an example in the first posts (swell x cool)
    So, in the documentary, he sort of "complains" that people call his songs corny. And he explains: once, they used to call it "such and such". Nowadays, they call it "such and such". And he goes on saying something like; "why do they say they are corny? My songs are beautiful." I just mentioned he is around 80 years old because sometimes, when old people say a new slang, it ends up being too funny, and I didn't want that. Hope it's clear now. Thank you everybody for the brainstorming.
     

    bassoonery

    Member
    English, born in Japan
    I wouldn't use "corny" today, unless I was talking about music of the 70's!

    I definitely prefer "cheesy"; it seems to be quite common at the moment in England, but your film might be set elsewhere? "wack" and "bogus" might be Americanisms but I have not heard them in England in this context. And yes, "c**p" is a common word but it is used when something is acually pretty dire, not just music and not in a "funny but twee" way like "corny".

    Did that make sense...? My vote would be "corny" for the old, "cheesy" for the new.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    (Sorry, Lanikai ~ I hadn't realized the chap who's talking was actually making the music).
    I was going to suggest naff for today's description ~ but I suspect it suffers from the same kind of problem as wack ~ naff is BE (and also probably a bit closer to crap than required), wack AE. So on the whole I'd go with Bassoonery's suggestions.
     

    vicky1027

    Senior Member
    usa english
    What about drippy? Or lame? Soppy?
    I'm talking about those cheesy love songs...
    I believe the word you're looking is for is lame. At least for AE. That is very 70's / early 80's sounding. We used to use it all the time!

    Vicky
     

    Lanikai

    New Member
    Brazil - Portuguese
    Great, guys, I think we nailed it. I swear I will stop bugging you soon, just wanted to be sure of the combination you are suggesting. Lame seems to work for AE and BE, so, I guess it's perfect. What would be the combination?

    lame (old) x corny (recent) ?

    Bassoonery suggested cheesy iof corny. What do you think?

    (ps: Bassoonery, the songs are, in fact, from the 70's)
     

    anothersmith

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Great, guys, I think we nailed it. I swear I will stop bugging you soon, just wanted to be sure of the combination you are suggesting. Lame seems to work for AE and BE, so, I guess it's perfect. What would be the combination?

    lame (old) x corny (recent) ?

    Bassoonery suggested cheesy iof corny. What do you think?

    (ps: Bassoonery, the songs are, in fact, from the 70's)
    "Lame" is a more recent word than "corny."

    I agree with Bassoonery. I would use "corny" as the 70s term and "cheesy" as the more current term.
     

    Cathy Rose

    Senior Member
    United States English
    But lame is no longer used, ~ I haven't heard it in years ~ so it would be obvious which is which. Because BOTH corny and cheesy are still used, that would simply be redundant, and would cloud the issue. Does that make sense?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Hackneyed" was another way of saying "corny" in the 70s and 80s. In fact, "hackneyed" was not subject to wild swings of fashion because it was not a slang word, so I think it can still be used.
     

    Cathy Rose

    Senior Member
    United States English
    "Hackneyed" was another way of saying "corny" in the 70s and 80s. In fact, "hackneyed" was not subject to wild swings of fashion because it was not a slang word, so I think it can still be used.
    Yes, but I think that's the problem. Lanikai needs words that are slang and are a clear contrast.

    Lame - wack is still the most obvious. One is the most current and the other hasn't been heard in years. I do understand that wack might not be understood universally, so I would choose corny in its place. Just my humble opinion.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    If you're talking about love songs with pretty melodies and romantic words, I'd suggest mushy for an old-fashioned description.

    And I'd say that corny is something that guy would say, too, for an old-fashioned word.

    You could also add another word to whatever old-fashioned word you choose: icky

    Icky-mushy
    Icky-corny
    Icky-lame

    Icky is definitely old-fashioned.

    You could use it on its own or add it as an intensifier.

    AngelEyes
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top