corso abilitante

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Murphy

Senior Member
English, UK
In the context of university education, does anyone know what a "corso abilitante" is? The full name of the course is "Corso abilitante in Scienze della Formazione Primaria".

"Enabling course" doesn't make much sense.
According to Proz, "abilitante" can also mean "qualifying".

Is this some kind of foundation course?
 
  • london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Murph, it's the equivalent of a B.Ed, which qualifies you to teach - you don't have to do a PGCE if you do a B.Ed, same thing here now: years ago you had to do a "concorso di abilitazione" here to qualify to teach.:)
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    A PGCE is a "corso abilitante", but I thought that they were referring to a "corso di laurea" here (probably wrong!:D).

    Murph, if that's the case, it's a "Teacher Training Course". :)
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    A PGCE (post graduate certificate of education) is a course you take to become a teacher after you've graduated in the subject you intend to teach, while a B.Ed is a Bachelor's degree course in Education which then allows you to go straight into teaching.
    So is a "corso abilitante" a degree course in itself or is it something you do after your first degree?

    Edit: Just seen London's latest post. In fact, I've seen online some discussions about "corsi abilitanti" for people with the "diploma magistrale", so it looks like you don't actually need a degree to go on one of these courses, which makes it a bit different from the PGCE. Paul, can you confirm?
     
    Last edited:

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    A PGCE (post graduate certificate of education) is a course you take to become a teacher after you've graduated in the subject you intend to teach, while a B.Ed is a Bachelor's degree course in Education which then allows you to go straight into teaching.
    So is a "corso abilitante" a degree course in itself or is it something you do after your first degree?
    First you need to get your degree then you have to attend this "corso di abilitazione" to be allowed to teach (unless things have changed again in the last year)
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    See this Laurea in Scienze della formazione primaria "abilitante", (i.e. it qualifies you to teach in Primary Schools:). By the way, you have to hold a degree to teach in Primary Schools these days (unless you are already in teaching or did a "concorso" years ago when they used to accept "diplomati magistrali").:)

    Murph, maybe you should ask the person him/herself whether it's a B.Ed or a teacher training course.:)
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Murph, maybe you should ask the person him/herself whether it's a B.Ed or a teacher training course.:)
    Thanks LC, I'll do that, although the fact that he didn't write "laurea", which he has done for other courses, seems to indicate that it isn't actually a degree course. The course dates back to 2005/2006 but I don't know when the relevant changes were made to the Education system. Better to be safe than sorry, though. I'll ask.:)
     

    gva

    Member
    USA
    Italy/Italian
    Thanks LC, I'll do that, although the fact that he didn't write "laurea", which he has done for other courses, seems to indicate that it isn't actually a degree course. The course dates back to 2005/2006 but I don't know when the relevant changes were made to the Education system. Better to be safe than sorry, though. I'll ask.:)
    Recently, I had to translate "corsi abilitanti" into American English. In the USA, there are no equivalent courses such as the PGCE which have been mentioned in this thread as roughly the equivalent in the UK. After spending a lot of time trying to figure out how to render the concept for an American reader, I have come up with "courses for educator certification", which conveys what these courses are for in Italy.
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AmE - hillbilly ;)
    Recently, I had to translate "corsi abilitanti" into American English. In the USA, there are no equivalent courses such as the PGCE which have been mentioned in this thread as roughly the equivalent in the UK. After spending a lot of time trying to figure out how to render the concept for an American reader, I have come up with "courses for educator certification", which conveys what these courses are for in Italy.
    I think that (in AmE) it's called "teaching certificate", and that the course is called "teacher training." I'll have to check with my siblings who have worked in the U.S. school system.
     
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