'Cos' and 'Cause'

Inmaatje

New Member
Spain-Spanish
'Cos' and 'Cause' is like BECAUSE? Example sentences: "Cos with you" and "Cause it's all about the dog in me"
Thanks in advance.
Inmaatje


 
  • modgirl

    Senior Member
    USA English, French, Russian
    Inmaatje said:
    'Cos' and 'Cause' is like BECAUSE? Example sentences: "Cos with you" and "Cause it's all about the dog in me"
    Thanks in advance.
    Inmaatje
    Yup, that's it! (Just teasing you -- many people write "yup" instead of yes)
     

    modgirl

    Senior Member
    USA English, French, Russian
    elroy said:
    Should point out that they're informal.
    Most definitely. They're fine for personal messages, and you'll see cos and cause used on many internet forums, but they should not be used at all in formal writing.
     

    Inmaatje

    New Member
    Spain-Spanish
    Hi modgirl, many thanks for your quick reply. Just a question more, could I use them in a business mails? Could them be bad-mannered if I'll use one or an other mostly in emails to British people? Cheers. Inmaatje.
     

    Jad

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Not a good idea in business mails.
    In emails to british people it's not bad mannered at all, but if it's 'professional' it's not appropriate.

    Also, I believe in America they prefer to write "cuz"
     

    modgirl

    Senior Member
    USA English, French, Russian
    Inmaatje said:
    Hi modgirl, many thanks for your quick reply. Just a question more, could I use them in a business mails? Could them be bad-mannered if I'll use one or an other mostly in emails to British people? Cheers. Inmaatje.
    Others may disagree, but I would not use them in business mail at all, whether the letters are by post or are by e-mail.

    However, in letters that are strictly social, such as to your friends, many find them acceptable. I personally don't use those words, but many do.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Inmaatje said:
    Hi modgirl, many thanks for your quick reply. Just a question more, could I use them in a business mails? Could them be bad-mannered if I'll use one or an other mostly in emails to British people? Cheers. Inmaatje.
    NOOOOOOOOO:eek:
    It would be extremely unwise of you to use either of these in a business e-mail.
    That is a very diplomatic understatement.

    Oh, I see that others have made the same point with rather less drama:eek:
     

    Merlin

    Senior Member
    Philippines - Tagalog/English
    I usually use because. I often see "cause" in songhits and some magazines. I agree that's it's not good to use it in business mails. Some of my friends use it in their e-mails. Again, if we are with our close friends, it's ok to use it. But if we are writing/sending letter or e-mails, it's unwise to use it.
     

    Biondo

    Member
    England - English
    Personally i don't ever write "coz" or "cause" or any other variation of the word "because" because in my opinion it really isn't that difficult to type / write the full correct word. I also believe that it is important if you are learning English as you really don't want to get into bad habits, however, it is important to understand what these shortened versions of English words mean. They are fine to use in text messages or any very informal situation but as long as it is understood that they are slang.

    Biondo.
     

    QUIJOTE

    Senior Member
    USA
    panjandrum said:
    NOOOOOOOOO:eek:
    It would be extremely unwise of you to use either of these in a business e-mail.
    That is a very diplomatic understatement.

    Oh, I see that others have made the same point with rather less drama:eek:
    I think the entire use of it written or verbally should not be practiced.
     

    andres65

    Senior Member
    Venezuelan Spanish
    'Cos is a British spelling. American English would rather spell it 'Cause. It is obviously an aphetic form of "because". Something like "wot" instead of "what" (typically British), or "thru" instead of "through" (typically American). Very colloquial. Not for a formal writing.
     
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