cot [AE: folding bed] + crib [bed / residence]

Samo

Member
Usa English
cot in Be = crib in Ae. How do you say cot Ae in Be
cot in Ae is usually a folding bed often used temporarily.
 
  • You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Samo said:
    cot in Be = crib in Ae. How do you say cot Ae in Be
    cot in Ae is usually a folding bed often used temporarily.
    I think it's called a crib in AE, but a native will be able to confirm whether that is the case or not. It is also called a cot in AusE.
     

    Samo

    Member
    Usa English
    cot in Be and I think Aussie is for a baby Ae =crib. In Ae cot is a folding bed for temporary purposes.
    I would like to know how to say folding bed for adults.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    For me, here is a Cot, here a Crib - OK that one is rather more ornate than most, but in my mind a crib is small.

    I don't have a word for a folding bed for adults - it is a folding bed, or possibly a camp bed.
     
    Last edited:

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    We call such a folding bed a "zed bed". Don't know how local that is to my family though! (AE speakers - bear in mind that "zed" is how we pronounce the letter "z"!! I wondered for ages why there were products called, to me, "eee zed (EZ) chair" or "lay zed boy (lay z)" etc around!)
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Crib has a different meaning in black AE. It is what a single man calls his bed, his bedroom or sleeping space-- and by extension, if he doesn't have roommates, his entire apartment.

    It tends to be a gender-specific word, as I've suggested-- a little like the outdated "bachelor pad." A "pad" was a hipster's place to crash, the image implying something very minimal, not even a room but a spot where he could unroll a sleeping bag or even a literal remnant of carpet padding. The word got taken up by journalistic types trying to explain and popularize the beat lifestyle, and of course it made the migration to hippiespeak-- at least in the mass-viewership's imagination.

    Calling an apartment a "pad" implied that it was a loosely-structured and easygoing place, possibly a party house. Even moreso than "crib," the word got expanded to mean the whole apartment.

    And both words got adopted by a more general segment of the population-- "pad" by people who weren't all that hip, and "crib" by people who aren't all that black.
    .
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It's strange that FFB should quote crib with that meaning as black AE.

    Crib has meant "the place where I live" in English since Shakespeare.

    1597 SHAKES. 2 Hen. IV, III. i. 9 Why rather (Sleepe) lyest thou in smoakie Cribs..
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    panjandrum said:
    It's strange that FFB should quote crib with that meaning as black AE.

    Crib has meant "the place where I live" in English since Shakespeare.

    1597 SHAKES. 2 Hen. IV, III. i. 9 Why rather (Sleepe) lyest thou in smoakie Cribs..
    Having sat through several bucketfuls of black angst last night watching the film baby boy I can confirm that crib commonly means place where you live in that there vernacular.
     
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