cotizar al doble de precio de colocación

alison myles

New Member
english
Hi there!
I am in the middle of a translation course and this particular module covers Finance, and in particular language related to the Stock market. I'm having quite a few problems, and would be grateful for any help with this particular phrase. Thank you
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Fernando said:
    Just a guess:

    quoting at twice the IPO price

    Fernando's 'guess' is a very good one. However, colocación may...I stress may...be an offer price other than that of an initial public offering or IPO.
    It may, for example, be a secondary offering of equity, an underwriting of securities subsequent to an IPO.

    There are numerous other ways in which a price may be 'pegged', including spinoffs, private placements, and so forth. I would just be cautious to use the suggested translation as a subset of a range of reasonable alternatives.

    Cuchuflete.
     

    lauranazario

    Senior Member
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    alison myles said:
    Hi there!
    I am in the middle of a translation course and this particular module covers Finance, and in particular language related to the Stock market. I'm having quite a few problems, and would be grateful for any help with this particular phrase. Thank you

    Hi Alison... and welcome to the forum.

    Well, precio = price ...

    And according to the Wiley's English><Spanish Business Dictionary...
    colocación = placing, placement, post

    Sorry but "precio de colocación" was not an entry in this particular dict.

    Hope this helps,
    LN
     

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Needless to say, cuchuflete's remarks are exact. IPO is only a way of placing big stakes of a company shares.

    I chose this translation because is the usual reference in stock market. For the common retail investor, the IPO is the moment when he enters into a company. So the IPO price is the price that most of shareholders have in mind to know if they are losing or earning money. I didn't know at the moment a more general word.

    Off topic: 'to enter into a company' is obviously a Spanglish for 'entrar en (el capital de) una sociedad". Better suggestions?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I totally agree with Fernando's comments. They underline the importance of providing a term in its specific context. That will spare all of us a lot of guessing.

    If you want the "best" possible translation, provide the sentence or word as you found it.
    Alison Myles did a good job of telling us that this is a financial term, but it would have been ever better to have presented the phrase with the entire sentence, and still better with the preceding and following sentences! I know it is not always possible to do this, but when you can....


    To enter into a company, may mean, comprar acciones en una empresa.


    Fernando,
    Please start a new thread for a new term...I'll do it for you this time.

    Saludos,
    Cuchu
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Happy to help...the reason for the new thread is to help you...many people see a thread with 5 or 6 posts, and assume that the question has already been answered, so they don't even look at it. By starting a new thread, you get the attention you need.

    un abrazo,
    Cuchu
     
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