Couch in the house vs. Caps in the house

nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
"The endowment effect is a bias where we overvalue things that we own - you know, that old couch that you've had in your house. You know, if somebody were to, you know, offer you some money on eBay, they might think it's kind of - you know, a little ratty."

When I first heard this sentences I heard it wrong as "caps" not "couch" and it somehow felt strange that somebody would say that he/she has caps in their house. But now that I've read the transcript it feels fine because it's "couch" not "caps". So I thought, maybe saying something 'big' like furniture is 'in the house' is fine, but not 'small' things like 'caps' in the house and they fit better with 'at home'. Perhaps this is just my misundertanding from seeing small parts of the usage as a whole.

What do you think?

source: What Monkeys Can Teach Us About Being Human
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s difficult to understand why you’re even comparing a couch with caps (by which presumably you mean headwear?). The phrase “that you’ve had in your house” makes sense when referring to a large item of furniture, since we all fill our homes with furniture. It makes little sense when you’re talking about random items that may be “lying around” in your house or tucked away in a drawer somewhere. They’re not “part and parcel” of the place being habitable, as furniture is. Note that (in the UK anyway) if you rent somewhere to live, you often have the choice of renting either furnished and unfurnished accommodation.
     
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    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    It’s difficult to understand why you’re even comparing a couch with caps (by which presumably you mean headwear?). The phrase “that you’ve had in your house” makes sense when referring to a large item of furniture, since we all fill our homes with furniture. It does not make sense when you’re talking about random items that may be “lying around” in your house or tucked away in a drawer somewhere.
    Yes, that's right. It's not that there's any similiarity between a couch and caps, but that I somehow felt caps don't fit with "in the house" but a couch does. I wanted to check if it's correct.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, the reason it makes sense with a couch is because a couch is a semi-permanent fixture. It doesn't move a lot. A cap could be anywhere. It doesn't have a natural place to be like a couch.
     
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