cough up £10 million <in> storm damage claims

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
cough something ↔ up
Insurance companies had to cough up £10 million in storm damage claims.
Longman dictionary

What meaning of "IN" do you think is used here?
Thank you.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I've never thought about it but I'd say it means "in connection with" or "in compensation for".
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    WR dictionary - in - This word is used with a noun to indicate the aim or purpose of something.

    I'm happy to accept that perhaps there's no strict dictionary definition of "in" that applies here, which is the impression I got when I looked in the WR dictionary before my first post but if you want one, this is the closest.:)
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    This one sounds pretty accurate to me:
    [indicating activity engaged in]
    Our days were spent in swimming and sailing.
    They spent hours (engaged) in complex negotiations.
    You took your time in getting here!
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I would say no.5 from the Random House unabridged list is pretty good. "Means" means "method", and here it effectively means "by way of".
    • (used to indicate means):sketched in ink; spoken in French.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thank you for the answers. Though, I still think the "purpose" meaning is closer. I can't think of storm damage claims as an activity or means.
    (used to indicate means):sketched in ink; spoken in French.
    By analogy, I'd expect something like: Insurance companies had to cough up / pay £10 million in cash / in euro
    :confused:
     

    Kirusha

    Senior Member
    I rather think it's the previous meaning from the WR dictionary:
    This word is used with a following noun to show that the action, situation, condition, or manner of action is limited or described by that noun:to speak in a whisper. They are similar in appearance. He was dressed in a kilt; she was in her pajamas. We were not afraid to meet in public. Smith shook his head in amazement.
     
    Last edited:

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I'd say it means "in connection with" or "in compensation for".
    :thumbsup:

    If the dictionary does not give these definitions (or in settlement of), hard luck!

    And if you understand what is meant, why bother with a definition? :)
    No dictionary (not even the OED) can list every definition. In practice they can only give an alternative form of words (and there are many).
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    By analogy, I'd expect something like: Insurance companies had to cough up / pay £10 million in cash / in euro
    Well, there's the thing: They did not cough it up in cash, but in damage claims.
    If my house sustains storm damage, I don't go to a repairer (except for minimal work that needs to be done immediately and can't wait), but I go to my insurance company, and they will then appoint a repairer and pay them directly. I never see the money.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thank you all.
    If the dictionary does not give these definitions (or in settlement of), hard luck!
    But why wouldn't it?:D The word IN is very common, and the meaning in question I guessed should be so too.
    And if you understand what is meant, why bother with a definition? :)
    To understand better, and have other examples.
    Well, there's the thing: They did not cough it up in cash, but in damage claims.
    If my house sustains storm damage, I don't go to a repairer (except for minimal work that needs to be done immediately and can't wait), but I go to my insurance company, and they will then appoint a repairer and pay them directly. I never see the money.
    It doesn't matter whether they give you money or repair, I think. They pay (with whatever) in response to claims. It's you who make claims, not they. You do something by means of claims.:confused:
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    But why wouldn't it?:D The word IN is very common, and the meaning in question I guessed should be so too.
    You are not the only person to be unable to find a definition in a dictionary. I have on more than one occasion not been able to find explanations in the OED.:)

    The phrase in claims seems to be similar to phrases like the bank paid him $1000 in interest or the amount earned in premiums.
    If you understand these expressions, you could well be wasting your time trying to find definitions for the reason I have given: the lexicographers can't cover every meaning in the time available.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    The phrase in claims seems to be similar to phrases like the bank paid him $1000 in interest or the amount earned in premiums.
    If you understand these expressions,
    The IN here probably means "by means of", right? What Edinburgher meant. Or I'm wrong?...
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    But you can say "earn a premium", "pay interests", which would mean practically the same as with IN. While you you would never say "pay claims"... Right?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    An insurance company can pay out or pay a claim. The usual terminology is to settle a claim, but the company pays out an amount in claims, which is a standard expression.

    If you have an amount, you can use a preposition, e.g. pay 10 million dollars in interest = paid interest of 10 million dollars.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Since I know Vik will not be able to sleep tonight unless someone gives him an applicable dictionary definition, here is the appropriate definition from the OED:

    II.16 Expressing object, aim, or purpose: with an abstr. n., as in affirmation, answer, denial, memory, honour, proof, quest, recompense, reply, return, reward, scorn, search, testimony, token, witness, worship, etc. See farther under the ns.
    It is possible that the object here was orig. accusative, and that these expressions came under sense 31.

    I marked in bold two terms from the list that would properly fill the blank in "The company paid $300,000 in _______", just as "claims" or "damages" would.
     
    As I read through this thread, I too wondered why I couldn't find a definition of 'in' that was satisfactory, although both for the purpose of /by means of are close,

    Then I thought, maybe we're parsing this incorrectly in our minds.

    Instead, I now think it's more a question of legal set phrases revolving around "pay" where "in" is a fixed part of the phrase in legal settlement issues. It was helpful to go to WR's definition of damages:


    1. Lawdamages, [plural] the money estimated to be equal to the loss or injury sustained:to pay $10,000 in damages.

    (Just as one would say 'ordered to pay XMONEY UNIT AMOUNT in compensation, for instance.)

    (cross posted with GF)
     
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