could you help move some of the sails around(o/x)…

Jardino

Senior Member
Korean
topic
PP
A little better. Sophia's in the toilet: she's still feeling bad. Oh, well done for sailing the yacht.
Phil
Oh, you know, it's quite easy with a bit of practice. But the wind's getting stronger and there's a storm coming – could you help move some of the sails aroundplease?

I don't know why there is around. to me, there's no reason to write around. meaning for nothing in this sentence..
why does this use in this sentence and what does that mean in this sentence?
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I don't know why there is around. to me, there's no reason to write around. meaning for nothing in this sentence..
    why does this use in this sentence and what does that mean in this sentence?
    Because Phil says "move some of the sails around", we (readers) know that Phil is not good at sailing. A good sailor would never say "move some of the sails around". It's silly and it doesn't make sense.
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Because Phil says "move some of the sails around", we (readers) know that Phil is not good at sailing. A good sailor would never say "move some of the sails around". It's silly and it doesn't make sense.
    could you tell me exactly? then is that phrase verb? help sth around?
    Would you please tell us the source of your quotes? And context too, please.
    here : BBC Learning English - Course: lower intermediate / Unit 8 / Session 5 / Activity 2
    I still don't understand what around means...
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    That you for the source. Please link it every time you ask about it. The context is three people sailing around the world on a yacht, with sails. Sails need to be moved to catch the wind as it changes direction or to move in a different direction.

    All that matters is that Phil knows nothing about sailing as evidenced by him saying "move the sails around" which apparently isn't the correct term.

    'Around' has a great many possible meanings.
    Probably it's this one, from the WR dictionary above.
    in or to another, opposite direction or course: twisted her head around and saw him coming.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    To move some things around = to move some things from one place to another.

    Given a previous question I saw about this series of lessons, I think it's the writer who doesn't know much about sailing. I read the transcript of this lesson. PP is supposed to know what he's talking about - yachts don't have toilets - and his watch system is bizarre. :rolleyes:
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    To "move something around" means to move it randomly to several different places.

    If you were planning a room, you might "move the table around", putting the table in several places to see where it looks good.

    You cannot "move sails around". Sails are fixed to the mast and the boom. The mast is fixed. The boom has one end attached to the mast, and can turn.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    You cannot "move sails around".
    Well, that's not actually true. I've raced on boats with a choice of 5 headsails and 3 spinnakers, and we certainly moved sails around. I disagree that "move something around" implies that the movement is random. The contents of a cupboard (or a sail locker) could be moved around to bring to the front an item that might be wanted soon. However, I don't think that is what the sleep-deprived Phil was thinking about.

    Perhaps it's just best to accept that these lessons are trying to introduce language in an interesting way, but the writer lacks knowledge of the environment that might be thought necessary or appropriate.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    You cannot "move sails around". Sails are fixed to the mast and the boom.
    The most likely meaning of "move around" here is that they are changing course in such a way that the wind will be coming from the right instead of the left (or vice versa), i.e. they will be tacking or gybing, and this will mean the boom(s) (and thus the sails) will move to the opposite side of the boat.
     
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