coulisse

Discussion in 'English Only' started by apoziopeza, Apr 21, 2017 at 1:02 PM.

  1. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    Hi,

    Please advise, is the underlined word correct?

    Thanks,

    A.

    The regulation in Article 4 (2) of the Slovak Constitution, so-called constitutional protection of water, and a reaction of the European Commission to it, creates a suitable coulisse for combination of the ideas which I have, so far, presented only in separate contributions. This relates to the contemplations on the subject of the constitutional regulation, its extensity and intensity, on the material core of the Constitution and on internal material hierarchy of constitutional norms. The contribution represents an attempt to combine these themes through water.

    In my contribution I do not want to focus only on the very Article 4 (2) of the Slovak Constitution and the issue of the constitutional protection of water from the material perspective. I would like to use the constitutional protection of water as a coulisse to represent the ideas which I have dealt with more or less separately or individually, but the wording of Article 4 (2) of the Slovak Constitution and in particular the totally unjustified reaction of the European Commission to it create a room for interrelation and combination of these ideas.
     
  2. truffe2miel

    truffe2miel Senior Member

    91
    French (France)
    The idea you want to convey is that the issue on water is something like an example illustrating the demonstration of the author, a place to start with, a step in the demonstrative process?
     
  3. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    Yes, background or starting point
     
  4. Glenfarclas Senior Member

    Chicago
    English (American)
    It's an extremely rare word. I've never seen it in my life. It may or may not accurately express what you're trying to say, but I would rule it "incorrect" in terms of trying to write an essay people can understand.
     
  5. truffe2miel

    truffe2miel Senior Member

    91
    French (France)
    I agree with Glenfarclas that simple grammatical rightness doesn't make this word adequate.

    Maybe you could phrase it like this :
    "My contribution will be based on this Article 4 (2) of the Slovak Constitution, and the issue of the constitutional protection of water, to then elaborate toward the ideas which I have dealt with" ==> here introduce or summarize these ideas.

    This part of the sentence : "more or less separately or individually, but the wording of Article 4 (2) of the Slovak Constitution and in particular the totally unjustified reaction of the European Commission to it create a room for interrelation and combination of these ideas." is just a repetition of what you just said, only turned around. It's a sterile addendum in terms of argumentation, as it states A-B, B-A when you want to say A-B, and from there C.
     
  6. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    Thanks. Maybe also the word "platform" could be used instead.
     
  7. truffe2miel

    truffe2miel Senior Member

    91
    French (France)
    Or, if it is the "unjustified reaction of EU" who is important to the author, more than the article of Constitution, you could also state this fact in a first sentence, and then use it as a launcher to announce the content of the demonstration.

    But it seems to me that these 2 paragraphs say essentially the same, with only minor differences.
     
  8. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    Thanks.
     
  9. truffe2miel

    truffe2miel Senior Member

    91
    French (France)
    I don't feel so, it has too technical a feel to me.
    Maybe some more experienced English speaker could answer you on this.
     
  10. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    Thanks.
     
  11. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    :cross:
    To keep to the theatrical allusion: "creates a suitable backdrop for the combination of the ideas..."
     
  12. apoziopeza Senior Member

    slovak
    Thanks, yes, it is basically the same as "coulisse".
     
  13. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Which is unidiomatic - whereas "backdrop" is. :rolleyes:
     
  14. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    Wrong. A backdrop is a painted canvas which rises and falls upstage, hoisted on ropes. A coulisse is a groove in the stage floor in which side-wings slide on and off stage, or the wings themselves. Or rather they used to - I don't think coulisses have been used in Britain for a century or two, though the word is still modern French for the wings.
     
  15. Truffula

    Truffula Senior Member

    English - USA
    While literally the coulisse is a different technology of stage-setting than the backdrop, for the purposes of the metaphor in the context under discussion I think they are equivalent enough, and backdrop is a far more familiar word to nearly everyone.

    It might be better to use stage setting itself instead, as that is what is desired here: to use the constitutional protection for water to set the stage for the argument to be made.
     

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