count towards something

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Wookie

Senior Member
Korea, Korean
Europe’s power station owners emphasize that they are making the new coal plants as clean as possible. But critics say that “clean coal” is a pipe dream, an oxymoron in terms of the carbon emissions that count most toward climate change. (source)

According to the OED, count towards something means:
to be included as part of sth that you hope to achieve in the future: Students gain college credits which count towards their degree.

In the example above, I don't think climate change is what they hope to achieve in the future. Is that expression properly used in the example above? Or is that just a sarcastic way of speaking?
 
  • In Search Of

    Senior Member
    Well here nobody is hoping for climate change but the carbon emissions are nevertheless contributing to it, or counting toward it.

    Does that help?
    This is difficult, tell me if you don't want me to help you anymore wookie;)

    Ps John p isn't it the other way around?
     

    Wookie

    Senior Member
    Korea, Korean
    It sounds like it is being used as if the clean coal will be a positive toward improving the climate in the future.
    Can the expression be used with something you do not hope to achieve, such as :
    "Not wearing a seat belt counts towards severe injuries in a car accident."
    "Druk driving counts towards car accidents."?
     
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