countable/uncountable noun + has + a great deal

firee818

Senior Member
Chinese
1). Your friendship over the years and your support have meant a great deal to us.

Q1). Why we need to use 'have' and 'a great deal' in the above case?

Thanks
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    1). Your friendship over the years and your support have meant a great deal to us.

    Q1). Why we need to use 'have' and 'a great deal' in the above case?

    Thanks
    Your question is unfortunately a little unclear, but "have" is plural because it matches with "your friendship ... and your support," which are two things. It doesn't relate to "a great deal" at all.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You have two items – friendship and support – so you need the plural "have."

    "a great deal" simply means "a lot" – it's quite a standard phrasing, suitable for business correspondence and semi-formal and formal usage.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    1). Your friendship over the years and your support have meant a great deal to us.

    Q1). Why we need to use 'have' and 'a great deal' in the above case?

    Thanks
    In this sentence "have meant" is the present perfect form of the verb "mean".

    "A great deal" is a very old (but still common) idiom meaning "a lot". As C says, it's a little more formal than "a lot".

    Translation: Your friendship means a lot to us. Your support also means a lot to us. This is true now, and has been true for many years.
     
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