counterparts of "misdemeanour"

  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    All legal systems are different. It would probably be helpful to give an example of a misdemeanor so people know the level being discussed. But that doesn't mean crimes are even divided that way in other places.

    Some American misdemeanors:

    Minor drug offenses, such as possession of certain drugs
    Drunk driving
    Petty theft, including shoplifting
    Minor or simple assault or battery
    Trespassing
    Vandalism
    Minor sex crimes, including solicitation, prostitution and indecent exposure
    Resisting arrest

    Higher levels of these same crimes could be classified as felonies based on the exact details of the crime.

    And it also depends on where you are. Different states have different laws classifying crimes.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    In England and Wales, any illegal act is called an offence, since the distinction between felony and misdemeanour was abolished. There are different sorts of offences, such as arrestable ones and criminal ones and minor or petty, and serious, and that's all I know about it. I'd have to look it up and it doesn't appear to be a language question past that point.
     

    Curchmouse07

    New Member
    Hungarian
    All legal systems are different. It would probably be helpful to give an example of a misdemeanor so people know the level being discussed. But that doesn't mean crimes are even divided that way in other places.

    Some American misdemeanors:

    Minor drug offenses, such as possession of certain drugs
    Drunk driving
    Petty theft, including shoplifting
    Minor or simple assault or battery
    Trespassing
    Vandalism
    Minor sex crimes, including solicitation, prostitution and indecent exposure
    Resisting arrest

    Higher levels of these same crimes could be classified as felonies based on the exact details of the crime.

    And it also depends on where you are. Different states have different laws classifying crimes.
    I've just read on MacMillan that this word is used in the US but not "now(?)" in the UK. I assumed there was a word for whatever's not exactly a crime, but can incur some kind of legal action being taken, as there IS a generally used word for it in my native language.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    The word "misdemeanour" isn't used in England and Wales any more.

    The equivalent, I suspect, is known as a "summary offence" which covers things like most motoring offences, minor criminal damage and common assault - where the defendant doesn't normally have the right to a jury trial.
     

    Curchmouse07

    New Member
    Hungarian
    The word "misdemeanour" isn't used in England and Wales any more.

    The equivalent, I suspect, is known as a "summary offence" which covers things like most motoring offences, minor criminal damage and common assault - where the defendant doesn't normally have the right to a jury trial.
    Thanks! "Common assault" is also a good one to pick up.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    In my state, a misdemeanor (US spelling) is any crime carrying a penalty of less than one year incarceration. (All crimes, including speeding tickets, include the right to trial by jury.) Other states vary.
     

    Curchmouse07

    New Member
    Hungarian
    In my state, a misdemeanor (US spelling) is any crime carrying a penalty of less than one year incarceration. (All crimes, including speeding tickets, include the right to trial by jury.) Other states vary.
    Heh! "Only" one year spent in prison in a lifetime. A minor thing. American thinking? :)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    That's the maximum penalty. Not the average or usual. You are probably looking at it backwards. You can go to jail for a year (i.e. you did something serious enough to warrant that) and you still don't have a felony on your record.
     

    Le Gallois bilingue

    Senior Member
    English (U.K.)
    The word "misdemeanour" isn't used in England and Wales any more.

    The equivalent, I suspect, is known as a "summary offence" which covers things like most motoring offences, minor criminal damage and common assault - where the defendant doesn't normally have the right to a jury trial.
    ....but s/he does, in most cases, have the right to trial by three magistrates. Indeed, in Wales and England, approximately 90-95% of trials are heard in Magistrates’ Courts and only 5% in Crown Court by juries of twelve good men and true.
     
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