coup de gueule / coup de cœur

wombat75019

Member
Français
Hello!

J'ai (mal?) cherché, mais je ne trouve pas sur le forum : coup de gueule/coup de coeur.

Contexte : en fait j'ai envie que mes élèves me donnent soit leur coup de coeur, soit leur coup de gueule concernant une info qu'ils auraient vue/lue/entendue pendant la semaine, un peu comme des journalistes: "Et toi, Pierre, quel est ton coup de gueule de la semaine?"

J'avais pensé : "What's your raise hell of the week/What's your raise heaven of the week?" :D

Thanks!
 
  • Michelvar

    Quasimodo
    French / France
    Absolument, pardon, j'avais mal interprété le sens de "je n'ai pas trouvé". En fait je n'ai pas trouvé non plus.

    Après recherche, et en attendant les English natives, on trouve pas mal :

    ".....which news are your favourites and your not-so-favourites."

    Pour le coup de gueule on trouve "rant of the day" (192 000 hints sur google), "rant of the week" (62 000 hints).
     
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    brookter

    Senior Member
    United Kingdom
    J'avais pensé : "What's your raise hell of the week/What's your raise heaven of the week?" :D
    Sorry -- (you may be joking, but) I've never heard either of those...

    Suggestions:

    'Which news items were high points or low points for you this week?' (or items/bits/pieces of news)

    '... hits or misses...'

    '.... did you most love or hate ...'
     

    qusiemargo

    Senior Member
    English, US
    I'd probably change these noun forms into verb forms: "I want my students to tell us what they loved and hated in the week's news." "And you, Pierre, what article did you love/hate in this week's news?" On the other hand, if I were setting up a two-column table, for the title at the top of each column I would put "loves - hates" thus turning the verbs into nouns.
     

    wombat75019

    Member
    Français
    Thanks for your answers! I'm still looking for nouns rather than verbs.:D

    Can I say :
    --Pierre, what's your rant of the week? Pierre, what's your high point of the week?--Pierre, what's your whim of the week? Or do I really have to turn these into verbs?

    Merci, merci ! !
     
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    qusiemargo

    Senior Member
    English, US
    But why do you want nouns specifically?
    My research hypothesis at the moment is that English is more of a verbal language, i.e. that we pack our information into the verb. Any sites on good writing in English will recommend the use of strong verbs. French is more of a nominal language, e.g. "the something of a something of a something ..." For me, a good translation into English will respect this preference for strong verbs. And this should be kept in mind, especially in the classroom where we should want our students to learn to think "verbs". I would say this is a pragmatic difference which receives too little consideration in the language classroom.
     

    wombat75019

    Member
    Français
    Thanks, I perfectly understand. I am very well aware of what you wrote about French and English. However, as Michelvar wrote earlier on that "whim/rant of the day" was a possible option, I just wanted a native speaker to confirm his choices of translation, that's all.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    raise hell/heaven doesn't sound right to me, wombat. (Raise hell is also not something most classroom teachers would use with students, at least in the US).

    Raves and Rants or Bouquets and Brickbats are set phrases about praise and criticism.

    Or there's thumbs-up and thumbs-down.
     

    BAlfson

    Senior Member
    USA - anglais
    I like Michelvar's ideas, and, taking qusiemargo's comments to heart, why not, "Pierre, what made you want to rant or rave over the last week?"

    Cheers - Bob
    PS I see that wildan1 had the same thought while I was away.
     
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    franc 91

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    Which article in this week's press really made you angry and want to shout out about it and was there anything else in this week's news that you really enjoyed reading? (suggestion)
     

    qusiemargo

    Senior Member
    English, US
    By the way, wombat, be careful, because a "whim" is more of a "coup de tête" than a "coup de coeur" although the "coup de coeur" might be the cause of the "coup de tête" effect. A whim is something we do without thinking about the pros and cons. For example, "I came to France on a whim." "whim" is not the opposite of something we don't like.

    I do like wildan's "thumbs up - thumbs down". In class we could ask, "What do you give thumbs up to in the news this week? What do you give thumbs down to? " The students could even put their thumbs up or down when discussing an article, thus implementing the "total physical reponse" approach, even at the secondary level.

    Thank you, balfson, your comment warms the cockles of my heart.
     
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