coupled with the literary appeal of solitude

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ironman2012

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

Why do writers so often love to run? Running affords the freedom of distance, coupled with the literary appeal of solitude. There’s a meditative cadence to the union of measured breaths and metered strides. Writers and runners both operate on linear planes, and the running writer soon realizes the relationship between art and sport is a mutually beneficial one.

(This comes from theatlantic.com Why Writers Run by Nick Ripatrazone on Nov 11, 2015.)

Though I know each word of the blue part, what does "literary appeal of solitude" mean?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • ironman2012

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It should mean that solitude is especially attractive to literary types (writers).
    Thank you, it is much easier for me to understand the sentence. But I find it hard to understand the function of "literary".

    There is "there’s no shortage of literary depictions of running" in the same article: "depictions of running" is easy to understand, but with "literary" added, I'm lost.

    What does the adjective in "adjective + noun of" function, and how should I understand it?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Literary depictions of running" should mean "running as it is described/depicted in literature." Verbal descriptions of boxing = Boxing as it is described in somebody's speech. Photographic representations of anger = Anger as it is represented in photographs.
     

    ironman2012

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    "Literary depictions of running" should mean "running as it is described/depicted in literature." Verbal descriptions of boxing = Boxing as it is described in somebody's speech. Photographic representations of anger = Anger as it is represented in photographs.
    Please forgive me being mechanical: in this way, the literary appeal of solitude = solitude as it is appealing/attractive in literature --->solitude is attractive in literature, not "solitude is attractive to literary writers."
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    What is your point, ironman? Are you bothered by the idea that the "literary appeal of solitude" means something different to me than it does to you? I'm not.

    I suspect that most of your confusion results from the fact that Ripatrazone used "literary" in a way that seemed odd to you. It also seemed odd to me.:cool:
     
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    ironman2012

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I don't understand the function of the adjective in "adjective + noun of", such as "literary" in "literary depictions of running, the literary appeal of solitude". Without the adjective "literary", I find it easy to understand "depictions of running, appeal of solitude".
    "Literary depictions of running" should mean "running as it is described/depicted in literature." Verbal descriptions of boxing = Boxing as it is described in somebody's speech. Photographic representations of anger = Anger as it is represented in photographs.
    In above examples, it seems the adjective acts like a "preposition + the noun form of the adjective". So I think "the literary appeal of solitude = solitude as it is appealing/attractive in literature --->solitude is attractive in literature, not "solitude is attractive to literary writers.""
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You are certainly entitled to an opinion, ironman. And I've read your opinion and your reasons for having it. Although what you wrote seems reasonable to me, I still believe that Ripatrazone used "literary" in an unusual way with a different meaning from what you expect the word to mean. I'm entitled to an opinion too, and your opinion hasn't changed mine a bit.
     

    ironman2012

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Please don't take this the wrong way:)
    I just don't understand the function of the adjective in "adjective + noun of", and I want to see if I can get a general rule to understand it.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I'm not at all troubled or offended by anything you've had to say, ironman, so I don't think you need to worry about how I take your remarks, okay?

    I just don't understand the function of the adjective in "adjective + noun of"
    "Literary depictions of running" should mean "running as it is described/depicted in literature." Verbal descriptions of boxing = Boxing as it is described in somebody's speech. Photographic representations of anger = Anger as it is represented in photographs.
    I think your basic understanding of the structure is fine.

    Why do writers so often love to run? Running affords the freedom of distance, coupled with the literary appeal of solitude.
    I relied on the context rather than any analysis of the structure of Ripatrazone's remark to arrive at my belief that he means to say "the appeal of solitude to literary types (writers)." I don't think you should allow this unusual meaning to trouble you too much or question your own understanding of what this grammatical structure typically means.
     
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