courtyard bathroom

  • maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    I'd imagine it is an outdoor toilet, either a separate building from the main house, or one that can only be accessed from outside. We had one in my childhod home, as well as an indoor one. I've no idea what the builder thougth he was doing, adding one at the ground floor back, when the kitched it stole space from could have used one being accessible from inside.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Sounds like a realtor's hyped-up term for an outhouse. By the same reasoning, a slab of concrete in the back yard is a "veranda."
    .
     

    renetta

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    Thanks for you attempts at providing an explanation. I ought to have given you the context before, but I thought it was such a transparent expression for a native speaker that a context wasn't necessary. Unfortunalety, I was wrong. I say unfortunately because if the term had denotated a clear object it would have been easier for me to understand it and eventually to find a corresponding term in my language. Anyway, here is the context:

    "Bungalows features spacious and elegant courtyard bathrooms complete with a tropical garden shower"
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    renetta said:
    "Bungalows features spacious and elegant courtyard bathrooms complete with a tropical garden shower"

    That implies a changing room for a swimming pool, with "facilities". US usage doesn't like the word "toilet" and uses bathroom, even when there is no bath in it.
     
    I found the term "courtyard bathroom" used on a commercial website describing a hotel in India:

    "A former coconut plantation, the Coconut Lagoon Resort features traditional wooden bungalows with garden courtyard bathrooms."

    I think this is likely to mean that the bathroom (either in the BE sense of a room where you can take a shower or a bath, or the AE sense of a loo) is outside the living quarters.

    Anyway it's a very unusual term and I think it would be unwise to use it in general English. On the website mentioned above, it might be a bit of marketing hype to make it sound something nice!

    Being outside is one thing; maybe if they are in the courtyard they have to be shared as well.

    Robbo
     
    Top