Couth

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  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Used by Chaucer ("kowthe in sondry londes"), but until recently only preserved in Modern English in its negative form uncouth.
     

    Isshjone

    New Member
    Urdu
    It was cūth and now Couth but according to my knowledge in 1901 DR. Smith, William added in Smith's Bible Dictionary.
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Used by Chaucer ("kowthe in sondry londes"), but until recently only preserved in Modern English in its negative form uncouth
    In Scots dialect English, the adjective "couthy", meaning "polite", "respectable", "well-presented" can still be heard. This is a word I would myself use, and (but only in jest or irony), "couth" as the abstract noun related to it.

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    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Was it, like "kempt", "gruntled", and "sheveled", originally a humorous mirroring of a negative word, like "kempt", "gruntled", or "sheveled", as The Newt suggests in his #3?
     
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