cover a quilt / throw back the quilt

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
When somebody goes to bed and then puts a quilt on his body, can we say " he covers a quilt"? And when he gets up and moves the quilt away, how do we say? " throw back the quilt"?
Thank you very much.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    When going to bed, we might 'pull up the quilt', or 'get under the quilt', (and there are probably more phrases), but we wouldn't say 'cover the quilt'. This would mean putting something on top of the quilt.

    When waking up, yes, we might well say 'threw back the quilt'. And if we weren't so keen to get up, we might say 'crawled out from under the quilt'. ;)
     
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    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    He covers HIMSELF with the quilt at bedtime and he throws it off in the morning. It works with or without the "back" .
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    How about "he pulled back the quilt"? Is "throw back the quilt" also applicable for a guy who doesn't have groans and moans about getting up early?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    How about "he pulled back the quilt"? Is "throw back the quilt" also applicable for a guy who doesn't have groans and moans about getting up early?
    It's hard to explain, but "pull back" suggests that he's outside the quilt. You pull back the curtains to reveal the window - you are not behind the curtains when you do this. Throwing back the quilt is quite active - it suggests someone who is eager to get out of bed.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    After your explanation, I could think of an example in which "pull back" the quilt would work:

    A kid was laid up with a cold all day. His mother came over to his bed with a broth. She sat on the bedside, pulled back his quilt and waked him up. After a few sips, he lay down again and pulled up the quilt.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    IT works with the mother doing it because she is outside the bed, reaching the quilt a different way. Someone under the quilt cannot do this.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    How about a person violently removing a quilt another person is cowering under? Does "throw back" work better than "pull back"?

    Example: A group of teenagers found themselves trapped in an abandoned house with a devil. After killing most of the group, the devil entered one of the bedrooms to find the remaining survivor. He heard a shuddering breath under the quilt. He picked up a knife, walked over to the bed and threw back the quilt, leaving the cowering survivor exposed to the air.
     
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    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Thank you. Your version is much better, as it indicates a higher level of violence.
     
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    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Hi,
    Can we say "lift or raise the quilt" for the meaning of "throwing back the quilt or getting out of the quilg"? (used when getting up)
    Thanks!
     
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    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It would all be easier if you did what most of is do when describing this and ignored the quilt altogether! You can just say he got up or got out of bed and leave the quilt action to your readers' imagination.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    If you really must have the quilt, he could throw it back, or off. Lift or raise would not be great choices for me
     
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