Crème vanille ou chocolat et gâteau sec

slowpoke

Member
USA/English
Hi,

I need to translate a menu and under the heading Dessert is:

Crème vanille or chocolat et gâteaux sec

I believe gâteaux sec = cookies/biscuits

but I am confused as how to describe Crème Vanille and a search through my books and the internet has not helped.

Thanks in advance for your help
 
  • pbx

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    It’s a shortcut for ice cream, crème glacée. Not 100% sure, could be another thing, you could also have some light custard.
     

    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    Pourquoi "crème glacée" ? Je comprends qu'il s'agit simplement de "crème" parfumée à la vanille ou au chocolat.

    On emploie peu "crème glacée" en France (en fait, je crois même ne l'avoir jamais vu). On dit "glace" à la vanille, au chocolat, à la pistache, etc.
     

    valo__fan

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Yes crème glacée is ice cream but gâteau means cake and sec means dry so what you said must be true it can be cookies with vanilla and chocolate...
     

    pbx

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    itka, j’en ai souvent vu des crèmes (glacées) à la vanille, en France… mais c’est presque impossible de savoir de quoi il s’agit sans voir le produit !
     

    ladenteliere

    New Member
    English
    Crème anglaise for example is 'custard' but Custard in English is not the same consistency and you would not eat Custard on its own with biscuits. I would suggest this is more cream pudding with biscuits
     

    mathiine

    Senior Member
    français - France
    I agree with pbx because you often find ice cream with biscuits to eat with. It makes senses to me (more than crème anglaise only with biscuits). And it it were a cookie with vanilla and chocolate, it would be written : gâteau à la crème vanille (ou gâteau à la vanille).

    Then, ice cream is crème glacée (which is a type of "glace", the other sort being : le sorbet - besides, how would you say that in English? water ice or just sorbet?)
     

    XIII56

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Crème alone calls me up more a famous (in France) brand of dessert, whose name begins by Dan and ends by ette, and for which everybody stands up ...
    But, for those who don't know the product, I really don't see how to describe it. :eek:
     
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    Esteban451

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Crème vanille is different from crème glacée à la vanille.
    Crème vanille is not iced, just cool, and it looks like custard, but less liquid. And it can perfectly be eaten just on it's own, or with biscuits.
    Though, I'm not sure it exists in England, so is there a correct translation ?
     

    mathiine

    Senior Member
    français - France
    Crème vanille is different from crème glacée à la vanille.
    Crème vanille is not iced, just cool, and it looks like custard, but less liquid. And it can perfectly be eaten just on it's own, or with biscuits.
    Though, I'm not sure it exists in England, so is there a correct translation ?
    En effet, si c 'est comme la marque célèbre...mais ne dirait-on pas crème à la vanille comme crème au chocolat ?
    Ca dépend alors des gens. Je dis toujours crème à pour parler d'une telle crème.
     

    gillyfr

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would just translate it as "vanilla cream" or maybe "vanilla cream dessert". I wouldn't translate it as "pudding" since the word is not really elegant enough for a menu, and what most North Americans refer to as "pudding" (à la Jell-O) doesn't contain any cream at all.

    (Nicomon, as-tu essayé les Kream de Kooll, au rayon frais de ton supermarché? Ça c'est un dessert à la crème comme en France! :))
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    I would just translate it as "vanilla cream" or maybe "vanilla cream dessert".
    Absolutely, likewise for crème chocolat.
    It should be noted that this is a kind of restaurant "jargon", the correct writing being : crème à la vanille /au chocolat.
    This being said, nothing outstanding to expect from this menu and its poor man's dessert ...
     

    Avignonaddict

    Senior Member
    English - British
    It sounds a bit like blancmange (is this word known in French or some terrible English invention?) to me - a really horrible childhood memory. If I saw it on a menu I'd avoid the restaurant, so don't think it's what you're looking for!

    (I just checked the WR dico - it's blanc-manger in French - do people actually eat it?)
     
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    anangelaway

    Senior Member
    French
    It sounds a bit like blancmange (is this word known in French or some terrible English invention?) to me - a really horrible childhood memory. If I saw it on a menu I'd avoid the restaurant, so don't think it's what you're looking for!

    (I just checked the WR dico - it's blanc-manger in French - do people actually eat it?)
    blancmange? It really does look like a flan. I've never heard that name, ever. From that picture, it could be easily mistaken with some flan (à la vanille why not), or even with some crème of some sort.
    The "whitedish" (from the original Old French term blanc mangier) was an upper-class dish common to most of Europe during the Middle Ages and early modern period.

    Edit: Pour moi, une crème à la vanille serait ceci avec ce genre de gâteau sec.
     
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    Topsie

    Senior Member
    English-UK
    It sounds a bit like blancmange (is this word known in French or some terrible English invention?) to me - a really horrible childhood memory. If I saw it on a menu I'd avoid the restaurant, so don't think it's what you're looking for!

    (I just checked the WR dico - it's blanc-manger in French - do people actually eat it?)
    Blancmange!:eek: Reminds me of school dinners (along with "frog spawn" tapioca and other unmentionable delicacies!) As far as I know nobody in France eats "Blanc-manger" (a type of crème bavaroise), although it does apparently exist! The nearest palatable equivalent could be the Italian Pannacotta (?)
    On a menu perhaps "creamy vanilla/chocolate pannacotta" might sound appetizing! (?)

    P.S. perhaps "petits fours" instead of "gâteaux secs"...
     
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    BexTrad

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Blancmange is neither flan nor "crème". More like a cross between jelly and crème. And yes, horrible memories of school lunches. It was always pink, too!
    I suppose the nearest thing we have to crème in England is Angel Delight.. which i think is only known by it's brand name, and which is probably somewhere between "crème" and mousse if my memory serves me well.

    In response to the first question, though; if it's for an English restaurant i would be tempted to keep "crème". We brits love French words to make any old dish sound classy! At least that's what most restaurant owners seem to think!!

    Be careful if you choose to use "pudding", as there are huge differences between how this would be understood by BE and AE speakers.
     
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    Esteban451

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Italian Pannacotta is a baked cream, and comes nearer to French Crème brûlée.
    (cotta = baked, panna = cream)

    Blancmange is not a good translation at all... Maybe you could just leave it in French and add an English note with something along the lines of " Sort of thick cream flavoured with vanilla / chocolate " ?
     

    XIII56

    Senior Member
    French - France
    P.S. perhaps "petits fours" instead of "gâteaux secs"...
    I don't know if the meaning has changed in English, but here "petits fours" is salted food and generally dedicated to the aperitif.
    I'm aware I am by nature too reluctant to sweet&sour food, but even being open minded I don't think it will fit, with vanilla or chocolate cream. :D
     

    XIII56

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Sorry, after some verifications it seems to mean little cakes too for some people.
    But, as said Bex, I think even there it doesn't match what you're looking for.

    Do you have a name for crackers, but with sugar taste ? (like the cigarettes, or those you generally have in icecreams)
     
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    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    Blanc-manger (which really is another discussion) has nothing to do with crème [à la]vanille and the like. Among other things it is made with almond powder and is ... very good.
    For other discussions like pannacotta and crème brûlée , I'll leave it here, though there would be a lot to be said.
     

    BexTrad

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sweet crackers in ice-cream are "wafers" but i'm not even sure the cigarettes fit comfortably into that category.
    I think in this case "biscuits" covers it.
     

    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    Je crois que nous n'avons pas les mêmes valeurs ! ;) ...ou alors vous n'avez jamais goûté de blanc-manger... C'est un dessert très fin, pas facile à réussir et absolument délicieux ! Je ne crois pas qu'on ait pu vous donner ça dans une cantine scolaire...

    Et les petits-fours sont généralement sucrés... Le mot biscuit s'applique aussi bien à ces petits-fours qu'aux biscuits salés.
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    Je crois que nous n'avons pas les mêmes valeurs ! ;) ...ou alors vous n'avez jamais goûté de blanc-manger... C'est un dessert très fin, pas facile à réussir et absolument délicieux ! Je ne crois pas qu'on ait pu vous donner ça dans une cantine scolaire...
    Yes ! Et surtout dans ce menu ...
    Et les petits-fours sont généralement sucrés... Le mot biscuit s'applique aussi bien à ces petits-fours qu'aux biscuits salés.
    Re yes. Je ne vois d'ailleurs pas très bien des petits-fours (accompagnant une crème à la vanille !) figurer dans ce menu ... On parle de gâteau sec (un seul ?), retenez bien l'adjectif sec ...
    Pour les petits-fours salés (un autre monde), pas complètement impossible mais on doit appeler ça "canapé" (qui s'apparente à des petits sandwiches).
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Crème anglaise for example is 'custard' but Custard in English is not the same consistency and you would not eat Custard on its own with biscuits. I would suggest this is more cream pudding with biscuits
    ladenteliere suggested pudding before I did. So I assumed, as he/she is from Scotland that it might be understood. By the way... Welcome to the forum. ;)

    As seen on bilingual or multilingual (European) websites...
    De délicieuses boules de Berlin fourrées à la crème vanille ou à la confiture
    Delectable Boules de Berlin, filled with vanilla pudding or jam

    Pot de crème chocolat à l’ancienne
    Old-fashioned chocolate pudding

    After a dessert of some divine crème chocolat (tasted like fresh made chocolate pudding)
    I agree, however, that the word pudding doesn't sound as nice as "vanilla creme (dessert)":) As for gâteau sec I also believe that biscuits (BE) or cookies (AE) covers it.
    I'm pretty sure the ones Angel linked to in post #17 are biscuits boudoirs. I personally call those langues de chats.
    (Aoyama) This being said, nothing outstanding to expect from this menu and its poor man's dessert ...
    À moins que ce soit un menu de restaurant/cantine scolaire? Comme ici :
    Mercredi 18 :
    Salade composée
    Nuggets de poulet et légumes verts
    Crème vanille et gâteaux secs Source

    PS : Gillyfr, non, je n'ai pas essayé les Kream de Kooll. Mais je faisais référence au pudding au chocolat maison... pas aux trucs à la Jell-O.
    Et que je sache, la crème vanille contient du lait et des jaunes d'oeufs, mais pas de crème.
     
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    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    À moins que ce soit un menu de restaurant scolaire? Comme ici :
    Mercredi 18 :
    Salade composée
    Nuggets de poulet et légumes verts
    Crème vanille et gâteaux secs
    Sûrement.
    J'étais pour une cantine scolaire ou ... pénitentiaire ...
    Ce qui exclut, on l'imagine, les petits-fours et le reste ...
     
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