Cracks in your skin

Gleb Savelyev

Member
Russian
Good morning (afternoon, evening)!

When it gets cold and windy outside my hands are always covered with small thin 'cracks'. Dictionaries don't say that these should be called 'cracks', but they are cracks in the skin in fact, aren't they? So what do you call the small wounds in your skin? Perhaps it's correct to say 'the skin gets cracked (or any other participle instead of 'cracked')'?

P.S. Hope it won't be regarded as a new thread but I've got one more question. Is it correct to say 'a dictionary says' as in the sentence above?

Thank you a lot!
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    So what do you call the small wounds in your skin?
    Good morning. Cracks sounds normal to me.

    Perhaps it's correct to say 'the skin gets cracked (or any other participle instead of 'cracked')'?
    My hands get dry and cracked in cold weather also sounds normal. I have often heard references to dry, cracked skin in lotion commercials on T.V.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    This website confirms what owlman says:

    Cracked Skin on Fingers, Hands, Feet, and Lips: Causes and Treatment

    Cracked skin can happen when your skin barrier is compromised. Usually, it’s a symptom of dry and irritated skin, but there are many possible causes.Your feet, hands, and lips may be especially prone to cracking. However, depending on the cause, cracked skin can develop in other areas, too. ... Petroleum jelly treats cracks by sealing and protecting your skin. The jelly has the ability to lock in moisture, which helps the cracked skin.
     

    Ellieanne

    Senior Member
    British English, South East
    Good morning (afternoon, evening)!

    When it gets cold and windy outside my hands are always covered with small thin 'cracks'. Dictionaries don't say that these should be called 'cracks', but they are cracks in the skin in fact, aren't they? So what do you call the small wounds in your skin? Perhaps it's correct to say 'the skin gets cracked (or any other participle instead of 'cracked')'?

    P.S. Hope it won't be regarded as a new thread but I've got one more question. Is it correct to say 'a dictionary says' as in the sentence above?

    Thank you a lot!
    It is correct to say ‘a dictionary says’.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    There is a specific word for this, although I've only heard it as the adjective form "chapped" and almost always describing lips, but in principle it can describe cracks in other areas of skin.
    chap /tʃæp/ vb (chaps, chapping, chapped)
    1. (of the skin) to make or become raw and cracked, esp by exposure to cold
     
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