crave doing/ crave for doing

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LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
:)Hi, everyone,

I am going to make a sentence with "crave", and I want to express I am eager to learn English,

I crave learning English.
I crave for learning Enlglish.

Which one is idiomatically correct? Thanks.


LQZ
 
  • linguafranca88

    Member
    English, Armenian
    Hi LQZ

    The correct way to say it is definitely not "I crave for learning English." The grammatical structure is correct in "I crave learning English," but I've never heard an expression like that before. We can wait for someone else's opinion too. :)

    "For" is used with "craving," as in "I had a craving for strawberries" but it's more common to say "I was craving strawberries" or "I am craving strawberries."
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Hi LQZ

    The correct way to say it is definitely not "I crave for learning English." The grammatical structure is correct in "I crave learning English," but I've never heard an expression like that before. We can wait for someone else's opinion too. :)

    "For" is used with "craving," as in "I had a craving for strawberries" but it's more common to say "I was craving strawberries" or "I am craving strawberries."
    :) Thank you, linguafranca88,

    How about this one? Does it make sense to you?

    I am craving learning idiomatic English.
     

    linguafranca88

    Member
    English, Armenian
    That does sound a lot better. I think it's because craving isn't something constant. Presumably, if one were craving learning a language, he/she would do something about it. You're craving strawberries, so you would go out and buy some strawberries. Unless it's something like "I crave strawberries whenever I see a picture of them," you would use "craving."

    Hope that helps!:)
     

    drzeug

    New Member
    English - US
    I am craving learning English from you. ;)
    Unlike I am craving strawberries, using crave with a gerund phrase like learning English doesn't sound quite right.
    If you're set on using the word "crave", then the best option would be:

    I crave to learn English
    This construction has a very poetic sound to it.
    A retired pirate with more stumps than limbs, for example, might say:
    I crave to sail the seas once more.
    or
    I crave to feel the cool wind against my back.

    Like Linguafranca88 said, "craving isn't something constant", which is especially true if you're using the "-ing" form. If you use the simple present, "crave", like in my example above, it better describes your general, constant desire to learn English... and very dramatically at that.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'To crave learning English' does not work: it is not valid.
    We crave a definite thing or result, not a process, so a gerund is not good.
    Less bad would be 'to crave a knowledge of English', but even this is not right.

    'Crave' implies either that there is some insuperable obstacle in the way, or that we are driven by an insuperable compulsion. Either way, the suggestion is that we are placed in an intolerable position.

    The prisoner in chains craves freedom (but can't have it).
    The cocaine addict craves his fix (but can't pay for it: so he has to commit crime to get it).

    Now learning English does present its difficulties, but it is not as bad as that.
     
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    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'I am craving for a new boyfriend.' always sounds OK.
    Sorry, but I can't agree. In this context;
    -- 'for' is better left out
    -- the present simple is better than the present continuous
    -- in any case, 'crave' is not the best word here, because it needs a definite object as its aim.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    :)Hi, everyone,

    I am going to make a sentence with "crave", and I want to express I am eager to learn English,

    I crave learning English.
    I crave for learning Enlglish.
    Far better is: "I crave to learn English" - I disagree with Ted's ascription of inimical implications, I disagree with linguafranca88's suspicion of the verb and I disagree with wandle's insuperable obstacles.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I disagree with wandle's insuperable obstacles.
    Well, perhaps 'insuperable' is an overstatement, but the point is important.

    A brief survey of the examples thrown up by this Google search:
    ('I crave to feel your touch.' 'I crave to earn respect.' 'I crave to be thin.' 'I crave to hold that one person.')
    shows that these are all instances of a result that is being craved, not a process: and a result that is either not in the person's control, or is faced by a serious obstacle. In all these cases, the implication is that the person feels they are suffering from the difficulty of their situation.

    If someone is very eager to learn English, that can be a strong emotion, but it does not involve any sense that the person is suffering. If their desire really is strong, they will act on it and satisfy it in the ordinary way.
     
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    Sorry, but I can't agree. In this context;
    -- 'for' is better left out
    -- the present simple is better than the present continuous
    -- in any case, 'crave' is not the best word here, because it needs a definite object as its aim.
    1. 'for' is better left out : Yes. But what if it was a reply to a question like 'why do you look so sad?'

    2. the present simple is better than the present continuous : I crave for a new boy friend. - A girl can hardly say this when she has a boyfriend, although it is her disposition.

    3. in any case, 'crave' is not the best word here, because it needs a definite object as its aim. - I agree with you on this point.
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    If you want to use "for", say "I have / had a craving for (some chocolate etc)."

    You can crave things such as attention, respect, freedom and foods, but using it for "boyfriend" sounds odd to my ear. In fact, its use with a verb (I crave to learn ... / to sail ... ) also sounds strange to me.
     

    sinkya

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hi.

    Can I say these below, and do they mean the same? My dictionary is not helpful.

    I am craving for chocolate.
    I am craving chocolate.

    Thank you.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    They both sound a bit odd to me. :(
    I think a more natural way of saying it (in BE at least) would be "I have a craving for chocolate".
     

    sinkya

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you DonnyB!

    I am wondering if there is BE/AE difference here.

    I just realized that there is a sentence by drzeug "I am craving strawberries" in this thread posted earlier, but "I have a craving for ...." could be more popular in the U.S. too. Sorry, I could have quoted it it, only if I paid more attention when I read it the first time.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Can I say [...] I am craving chocolate.
    As you seem to have noticed, posts #2 (CanE?) and #6 (AmE) affirm that you can. There is no shortage of Google Web hits for the sentence either even Google Books shows a few instances, e.g.,
    .
    On a day when your thinking is unusually creative and sharp, you can probably thank you brain chemistry for smoothly activating message transmission. Yet brain chemistry is sneaky because it acts below our level of conscious awareness. I may know I am craving chocolate, but I can't see or hear my synapse crying out for some serotonin molecules. (Jane M. Healey, AmE, source)
    .
     
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    himejanai01

    New Member
    Filipino
    They both sound a bit odd to me. :(
    I think a more natural way of saying it (in BE at least) would be "I have a craving for chocolate".
    Hi, I am also confused. I always use "craving for" as in "I am craving for chocolates" when someone pointed out to me that I was saying it wrongly. I was told it should be either be "I am craving chocolates" or "I have a craving for chocolates". But that someone did not explain to me why so until now I'm still confused. What's the difference between the 3 sentences and why is the first one wrong? Thank you.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The most typical examples I can think of are cravings for addictive substances and the sort of craving where a pregnant woman longs for unusual foods. Some people have a strange craving to eat earth.

    Generally I'd agree with teddy's statement (which was made to emphasise the fact that in the OP's context this wasn't the right word) -- but I'd substitute "unusual" for unnatural. I might crave sun-ripened peaches in the middle of winter, simply because they aren't available and so it's unusual for me.
     

    ShilpiGoel

    New Member
    Hindi-india
    I know it's bit late to reply .. but verb crave work as verb go. That means
    1) crave+to+first form of verb+ object.
    for eg- I am craving to have some vine.
    I am craving to learn English

    2) Crave +for +noun (mostly abstract noun or non living things)
    For eg- I am craving for some chocolates/ fame.
    I had always craved for knowledge.
     

    Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English

    Chinese Su

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    :thumbsup::thumbsup: These are the best options. Crave something or have a craving for something.




    I can't imagine anyone saying this.



    One usually craves food, no? And select things, such as the ones mentioned in #14.
    Our colloctions dictionary provides useful examples of how crave/craving is used.
    craving - WordReference.com Dictionary of English

    I wouldn't expect to hear the continuous form used very often.

    Perhaps this, where the speaker intends to emphasise what he desires at this very moment:
    I'm craving an ice-cold beer right now.
    I've understood even better, Erebos12345 and Velisarius :D Thank you both for your further explanations!

    I find the site useful too craving - WordReference.com Dictionary of English :D
     

    jorgo

    Senior Member
    Serbian
    Hi,

    I know this might be belated question, just to double check if I grasped everything properly.

    I thing I got what you have written here, but just to ask.

    May I say:

    I have been craving (for) you, while you were absent?

    I have been craving (for) your love?

    I have been craving to have your love - that`s fine!
    I am craving to sort out financial problems - not ordinary, but might work?
     

    Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi
    I have been craving (for) you, while you were absent? Mmm...I don't think so.

    I have been craving (for) your love? This one is possible.

    I have been craving to have your love - that`s fine! Sorry. This one's less plausible than the two preceding sentences.
    I am craving to sort out financial problems - not ordinary, but might work? No, sorry. :thumbsdown:
     

    jorgo

    Senior Member
    Serbian
    Thanks for the contribution!

    If we remove "for" from the sentences, what would be the difference between first and second one?

    1. I have been craving you while you were absent.
    2. I have been craving your love (while you were absent).

    Because it seemed (wrongly, obviously) to me that "crave" is kind of "longing for" someone or something? Maybe I dont see it, but those two sentence have no differences (in meaning).

    Third one - I have seen that "crave" is followed by "to", so what would be a problem with this one?

    Fourth one - I know, it doesn't work:)
     

    Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    If we remove "for" from the sentences, what would be the difference between first and second one?

    1. I have been craving you while you were absent.
    2. I have been craving your love (while you were absent).
    Just so we're clear, adding for in 1 and 2 would be incorrect.

    The two possible structures are:
    A-To crave [something]
    B-To have a craving for [something]

    Despite the fact that your sentences 1 and 2 contain the words "have" and "craving" (like in structure B), they are in fact a variation of structure A, and therefore for is not correct. You're conjugating "to crave" into [whatever that tense is called]: I crave. I was craving. I craved. I have been craving.

    If you want to conjugate structure B and keep for, then you need to conjugate have. I have. I was having. I had. I have been having a craving for... Grammatically correct, but stylistically terrible. It's doubtful anyone would ever word it like that.


    As for the difference between the two, as mentioned in #14, you usually crave food and a few other select things. Craving a person really doesn't sound right. Craving love is not common, but possible. Because we usually use crave with food, 1 can almost sound like you want to eat the other person like a cannibal. In 2, you're craving their love. That could be interpreted as wanting to have sex with them. But as I said, we probably wouldn't use 1, so it's not really useful to try to find the difference between them.

    Third one - I have seen that "crave" is followed by "to", so what would be a problem with this one?
    Can you provide us with your quote and your source? All I can tell you at this point is that "I have been craving to have your love" sounds worse than your first two sentences.
     
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