Croatian (BCS): hiljada or tisuća?

sladdie

New Member
English
Hello everyone! One question.
My father was born in Croatia and lived their for much of his childhood till he moved to Canada. When I asked him the word for one thousand in Croatian he told me it was 'hiljada', though some Croats whom I've met have said it is 'tisuća'. So which is it?
 
  • Aldin

    Member
    Bosnian
    tisuća is a slavic word,and hiljada is a foreign,
    tisuća is primarly used in Croatia,hiljada in Bosnia,Montenegro and Serbia
     

    el_tigre

    Senior Member
    Croatian(štokavski+čakavski)
    In Herzegovina is used tisuća , in Bosnia hiljada!
    The word tisuća is btw, mentioned in lawbook of serbian emperor Dušan.(Zakonik cara Dušana)
    But , today in Serbia people rarely use it
     

    Tekeli-li! Tekeli-li!

    Member
    Czech | Czech Republic
    I imagine it's a matter of religion - hiljada is a Greek word in origin, so I guess it would be preferred in traditionally Orthodox areas where the language was influenced more by Greek than Latin. Am I correct?
     

    Mirna

    New Member
    Bosnia and Herzegovina, croatian
    hiljada was used in ex-Yugoslavia, when Sebo-Croatian exsisted.
    It has nothing to do with religion. Just hiljada is a serbian word, tisuća is Croatian word. But we do understand each other.
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    Mirna said:
    hiljada was used in ex-Yugoslavia, when Sebo-Croatian exsisted.
    It has nothing to do with religion. Just hiljada is a serbian word, tisuća is Croatian word. But we do understand each other.

    Mirna, I would say that Croats and Bosnians have always used tisuća, now and in ex-Yugoslavia. I have relatives in Sarajevo, and some friends Croats, and I used to go to summer holidays to Croatia, and as far as I remember, they never used hiljada, but tisuća.

    So, this has nothing to do with Serbo-Croat or ex-Yugoslavia. It is just Croatian and Serbian, nothing more, notihing less.
     

    Mirna

    New Member
    Bosnia and Herzegovina, croatian
    Iit does depend on person I think...my granny always used hiljada, she still does. Don't know why really.
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    In Bosnia (as I see you come from Bosnia), there is a mixture... Some people speak more as Croats, and some more as Serbs. Maybe it depends on the place they live. If they live closer to Croatian border, they say tisuća, if they live closer to Serbian border, then they use hiljada... Maybe there are some other reasons apart of the closiness to the respective border.
    On the other hand, I also think that, as a matter of fact, tisuća is old Serbian word, but it is changed for hiljada a long time ago, who knows why. Croatian has manz words that were originaly used in Serbia, too, and are Serbian words, too, but they were changed for some foreign words, like štednjak, for example...
    Maybe it has something to do with different oppresors we had - Croatian under Austro-Hungarian Empire, and Serbs under Ottoman Empire... There are a lot of words in Serbian that are of Turkish origin, while Croats are still using the Slav word for the same thing...
    But then... It's another subject.
    Cheers.
    N.
     

    Mirna

    New Member
    Bosnia and Herzegovina, croatian
    Just a little correction! I live in Bosnia and Herzegovina, not Bosnia. Thank you!
     

    Mirna

    New Member
    Bosnia and Herzegovina, croatian
    yeah, BiH is ok. Not touchy is just matter of nationality or whatever...Just like maybe people from Montenegro insult if you call them Serbs;)
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    Mirna said:
    yeah, BiH is ok. Not touchy is just matter of nationality or whatever...Just like maybe people from Montenegro insult if you call them Serbs;)

    Whatever.

    Now they have their own state, too, so from now on, I doubt you can make an error like this.
     

    el_tigre

    Senior Member
    Croatian(štokavski+čakavski)
    In russian is tjesjuča (тысяча)

    Anyway , word tisuća is mentioned in lawbook of serbian medieval emperor Dušan(Zakonik Cara Dušana)
    Why today Serbs do not use it? I do not know....
     

    el_tigre

    Senior Member
    Croatian(štokavski+čakavski)
    natasha2000 said:
    In Bosnia (as I see you come from Bosnia), there is a mixture... Some people speak more as Croats, and some more as Serbs. Maybe it depends on the place they live. If they live closer to Croatian border, they say tisuća, if they live closer to Serbian border, then they use hiljada... Maybe there are some other reasons apart of the closiness to the respective border.
    On the other hand, I also think that, as a matter of fact, tisuća is old Serbian word, but it is changed for hiljada a long time ago, who knows why. Croatian has manz words that were originaly used in Serbia, too, and are Serbian words, too, but they were changed for some foreign words, like štednjak, for example...
    Maybe it has something to do with different oppresors we had - Croatian under Austro-Hungarian Empire, and Serbs under Ottoman Empire... There are a lot of words in Serbian that are of Turkish origin, while Croats are still using the Slav word for the same thing...
    But then... It's another subject.
    Cheers.
    N.
    I think this is the right explanation .
    :)
    After all , territory Serbia and Bosnia&Herzegovina was under turkish administration for abiout 500 years.
    But, the fact is that croatian language most close to the current croatian standard is spoken in The west Herzegovina.
     

    Maja

    Senior Member
    Serbian, Serbia
    el_tigre said:
    In Herzegovina is used tisuća , in Bosnia hiljada!

    I disagree, because people who live in the Eastern Hercegovina which is a part of the Republic of Srpska (or Serbs if you like) DO NOT use word tisuća but hiljada. But I guess that Croats in, for example, Mostar (which is also Hercegovina), do use it.

    Pozdrav!
     

    Aldin

    Member
    Bosnian
    You all speak about Croats and Serbs in Bosnia,but in reality there are Bosniaks too.They mostly speak hiljada and it doesn't have to anything with religion.My parents speak hiljada and all Bosniaks that I know.I never heared any Bosniak to say hiljada.And one more thing.Bosnia is a historical region north of Neretva river and Herzegovina(historicly HUM) is southern part the river(southeast).Today situation is a bit different.
    If you live in Mostar you can't be Bosnian,and if you live in Banjaluka you can't be Herzegovian.But in reality you only can be Bosniak,Croat,Serb or the others.Bosnian and Herzegovian are terms that legally do not exist.
    tisuća is western variant and hiljada eastern.Because Bosnia is in the middle,both words are used.
     

    el_tigre

    Senior Member
    Croatian(štokavski+čakavski)
    Maja said:
    I disagree, because people who live in the Eastern Hercegovina which is a part of the Republic of Srpska (or Serbs if you like) DO NOT use word tisuća but hiljada. But I guess that Croats in, for example, Mostar (which is also Hercegovina), do use it.

    Pozdrav!
    You are right Serbs in (Eastern) Herzegovina probably never use word tisuća. (Here is say probably because I have never been in eastern Herzegovina )

    :)

    But the title of this topic is Croatian: hiljada or tisuća?

    So , here we are based on speech of Croatian people.
    And in standard croatian language thousand is tisuća not hiljada.
    but still Croats in Bosnia still use it in major cases.
    I do not know where sladie's father comes from...
    Pozdrav također! :)
     

    българин

    Senior Member
    bulgarian
    Anyway, I just thought I'd add my input....In Bulgarian we also say hiljada (хиляда). But I would have never known what tisuća is untill I saw this forum. The origin of hiljada is Greek ===> χιλιάδα (translates into "hiliada")
     

    mirodjija

    New Member
    english australia
    Mirna said:
    yeah, BiH is ok. Not touchy is just matter of nationality or whatever...Just like maybe people from Montenegro insult if you call them Serbs;)
    Sorry Mirna but I have to agree with Natasha...you were a little touchy.
    This is a forum and the current subject is 'hiljada' & 'tisuca' (not about political nonsense)
    Be a little more flexible & all will be well.
    And, by the way, I know many Montenegrins who identify themselves as Serbians.
    :D
     

    Stormrage

    New Member
    Bosnian/Croatian - Bosnia and Herzegovina
    It's simple In Croatia it's tisuća, in Serbia:cross: it's hiljada, and in Bosnia both forms are valid (it's the same situation like with the names of months, or word for bread: kruh- hljeb.)
     

    farisca

    New Member
    Bosnian
    The best word for 1000 is "milja" xD

    But, seriously, in Bosnian both versions are correct, even though "tisuca" is rarely used among Bosniaks.

    (It reminds me of the old Bosnian hymn:
    Zemljo tisućljetna
    Na vjernost ti se kunem
    Od mora do Save
    Od Drine do Une)

    It is in Bosnian, but the word "tisuca" is used... )

    Pozdrav
     

    Athaulf

    Senior Member
    Croatian/Bosnia, Croatia
    So , here we are based on speech of Croatian people.
    And in standard croatian language thousand is tisuća not hiljada.
    but still Croats in Bosnia still use it in major cases.

    It's simple In Croatia it's tisuća, in Serbia:cross: it's hiljada, and in Bosnia both forms are valid (it's the same situation like with the names of months, or word for bread: kruh- hljeb.)

    It's true that tisuća is preferable in formal standard Croatian, but in many, if not most parts of Croatia, hiljada is used along with tisuća in everyday speech. This is not limited to Croats coming from outside of Croatia -- in Zagreb, I've heard people of many different regional backgrounds using it. When I moved from Bosnia to Zagreb, I made an effort to switch from saying hiljada to tisuća (alongside many other words, of course), but then I realized that many Zagreb natives were using hilljada, so nowadays I use them both interchangeably in everyday speech.

    Also, many classic Croatian writers have used hiljada, so I definitely wouldn't consider it wrong in standard Croatian or avoid it as a matter of principle. The only contexts in which I would recommend using only tisuća are formal, non-artistic documents.
     

    trance0

    Senior Member
    Slovene
    Isn`t hiljada of Turkish origin? Someone mentioned it comes from Greek, but I think it actually comes from Turkish.
     

    Athaulf

    Senior Member
    Croatian/Bosnia, Croatia
    Isn`t hiljada of Turkish origin? Someone mentioned it comes from Greek, but I think it actually comes from Turkish.

    No, hiljada definitely comes from Greek. I don't know any online references about Croatian etymology, but English has borrowed the same word in the form chiliad, and you can see its etymology e.g. here.
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    It's true that tisuća is preferable in formal standard Croatian, but in many, if not most parts of Croatia, hiljada is used along with tisuća in everyday speech. (...)

    It is nice to hear that the "hiljada-tisuća"-"war" seems to not be "fought" any more.
    In the late 1990ies when I did some background research on Croatian and Serbian I found some that suggested that tisuća finally had been "declared Croatian" while hiljada had been "declared Non-Croatian".

    But what I gather from your posting nevertheless would be: tisuća = Croatian standard language while hiljada = substandard Croatian, right? Or would hiljada nowadays be acceptable in Croatian standard language too? That is: do Croatian media use hiljada? (I would be surprised if they did in newspapers and on TV news, but probably it is different with soap operas and TV shows.)

    (It is obvious to both of us that hiljada of course is native also to some Croatian dialects - and we are not speaking of Bosnian Croatian dialects only, of course; I'll just mention it here for those who don't know.)
     

    Athaulf

    Senior Member
    Croatian/Bosnia, Croatia
    It is nice to hear that the "hiljada-tisuća"-"war" seems to not be "fought" any more.
    In the late 1990ies when I did some background research on Croatian and Serbian I found some that suggested that tisuća finally had been "declared Croatian" while hiljada had been "declared Non-Croatian".

    But what I gather from your posting nevertheless would be: tisuća = Croatian standard language while hiljada = substandard Croatian, right? Or would hiljada nowadays be acceptable in Croatian standard language too? That is: do Croatian media use hiljada? (I would be surprised if they did in newspapers and on TV news, but probably it is different with soap operas and TV shows.)

    In the media and in formal documents, you'll most likely hear and read only tisuća. However, in everyday speech in Zagreb and many other places in Croatia, you'll hear both hiljada and tisuća. Also, you'll find both words in the works of great Croatian writers.

    Thus, I recommend sticking to tisuća in formal writing (e.g. when writing a newspaper article, a scientific paper, or a bureaucratic document), but you can liberally choose between hiljada and tisuća when writing poetry or prose and in everyday speech.
     
    Last edited:

    Lazar777

    New Member
    Serbo-Croatian
    this is a very interesting topic. I myself am Serbian and all we use is "hiljada". We know tisuca to be Croatian. However as there are many many many dialects of Serbo-Croatian, it varies place to place. To say tisuca or hiljada is just croatian or just serbian is imposible to say. I know for instance krajina serbs say "tisuca" so it really depends.
     

    el_tigre

    Senior Member
    Croatian(štokavski+čakavski)
    In the media and in formal documents, you'll most likely hear and read only tisuća. However, in everyday speech in Zagreb and many other places in Croatia, you'll hear both hiljada and tisuća. Also, you'll find both words in the works of great Croatian writers.


    Yes, it is surprising. :) Even is non-štokavian speaking region is used-that made quite surprised. I have hear insular "klapa" a cappela song using "hiljada". :D
     

    torat

    New Member
    English
    Hi all!

    Just to note that in English, too, there is an echo of this thread: the rarer Eng. chiliad and, of course, the much more frequent thousand are cousins, etymologically, of hiljada and tisuća, respectively.
     

    slavic_one

    Senior Member
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
    All is said, just a little sum up:
    In Croatian you can hear (in all parts) both "tisuću" and "hiljada". On TV, newspapers and so on you'll probably hear only "tisuću". I use "tisuća" and "milja" more often than "hiljada" but I use all of them.
    Way back I heard that actually "hiljada" is Croatian and "tisuća" Serbian word, but it doesn't make much sence because of the Greek (Orthodox) origin of "hiljada" and "tisuća" as word used in all other north Slavic lngs (Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian...), so it goes with history and religion as previously mentioned.
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Yes, it is surprising. :) Even is non-štokavian speaking region is used-that made quite surprised. I have hear insular "klapa" a cappela song using "hiljada". :D

    Same here! A couple of years ago, I was surprised to hear "hiljada" used by a native Istrian in Croatian Istria. Before then, I had always assumed the word was only used in Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia.

    Way back I heard that actually "hiljada" is Croatian and "tisuća" Serbian word, but it doesn't make much sence because of the Greek (Orthodox) origin of "hiljada" and "tisuća" as word used in all other north Slavic lngs (Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian...), so it goes with history and religion as previously mentioned.

    Exactly. Slovene also uses the Slavic word "tisoč" and has never used any derivatives of the Greek chīliad.
     

    el_tigre

    Senior Member
    Croatian(štokavski+čakavski)
    Same here! A couple of years ago, I was surprised to hear "hiljada" used by a native Istrian in Croatian Istria. Before then, I had always assumed the word was only used in Serbia, Montenegro and Bosnia.

    2 months ago I have heard a deputy Croatian parliament( a native of Istria) using word "hiljada" during his speech. Nobody protested because of it.
     

    bolegr

    New Member
    Croatian
    http:
    //jezicnisavjetnik.mojblog.hr/arhiva-2-2009.html
    Vocabulary is a realy treasure, enjoy it. Uzivajte u bogatstvu jezika.
     
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