Crop vs harvest?

sambistapt

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hello amigos:) !

We are going to have a nice crop/harvest this year.

The crop/harvest of this year, It will not be affected by the climate.

Can these 2 nouns be used interchangeably on this context? If not; Please, point me out the difference between them:)

Thanks,

Sambista:cool:
 
  • Hello amigos:) !

    We are going to have a nice crop/harvest this year.

    The crop/harvest of this year, It will not be affected by the climate.

    Can these 2 nouns be used interchangeably on this context? If not; Please, point me out the difference between them:)

    Thanks,

    Sambista:cool:

    Hi Sambista,

    It is quite common to hear them used interchangeably.

    The crop - that which is grown.

    The harvest - the gathering in of the crop.

    LRV
     

    Orange Blossom

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    Hello amigos:) !

    We are going to have a nice crop/harvest this year.

    The crop/harvest of this year, It will not be affected by the climate.

    Can these 2 nouns be used interchangeably on this context? If not; Please, point me out the difference between them:)

    Thanks,

    Sambista:cool:

    To a certain extent, but they wouldn't convey quite the same meaning. A crop refers one food type, so if I say:

    I'm going to have a good crop this year my listener will wonder just what the crop is. The larger context will probably tell him/her. Perhaps I'm standing in a corn field or a rice paddy.

    If I say: I'm going to have a good harvest this year my listener will quite likely think that I grow several things even though harvest can be applied to a single food type.

    So in the sentence:

    We are going to have a nice harvest this year. My friends will know I am talking about all the things I grow in my garden: tomatoes, peppers, onion, beans, garlic, etc. My garden is growing well and there will be an abundance. Perhaps one or two things won't do well, but over all it's good.
    -------
    We are going to have a nice crop this year. I probably would never say this personally unless I modified 'crop' with a food name because it doesn't fit my situation. Now, if I were my late cousin, I would say such a sentence because he had huge fields of soybeans - one food type.

    Another slight difference <-- Crops are often, though not always, raised with the idea of selling and profits. Harvest does not have this association.

    Orange Blossom
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    This must be a cultural thing but I disagree with everything that Orange Blossom's usage indicates.

    In Austraila the terms are totally interchangeable under the context given in the question.

    Crops and harvests are both consumed and sold by the farmer.
    A crop can be a mixed crop or a single field of wheat as large as a small European country.
    A harvest can be a vegetable plot or a multinational cotton farm.

    .,,
     

    Orange Blossom

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    Once again, I suspect regional differences. Here if we say 'crop' in the singular here, it refers to one specific food (usually food that is, it could be cotton, flax, etc.) item and on very rare occasions a mixed field. We use the plural, crops, to indicate more than one type.

    Note: I didn't say that gardeners didn't use the word crop, but that it would be modified.

    I'm going to have a good bean crop. is an example.

    I could also say: I'm going to have a good bean harvest.

    The government discussing weather patterns and the effects on big farm production might say: The climate this year won't affect the crops. <-- Note the use of the plural. The singular wouldn't be used in this context. They (the government) would never use the word harvest, and neither do my farming relatives. They are thinking almost exclusively of monetary profits - for someone. Religious organizations would use the word 'harvest' in such a sentence but in the context of discussing hunger, food distribution, people's well-being etc. Not in the context of profits, selling, and buying.

    Those with small farms may indeed interchange the use of harvest and crop more freely here. They also grow a greater variety of crops and tend to serve a more local community where they know many of their buyers and the people who eat their food.

    Another slight difference <-- Crops are often, though not always, raised with the idea of selling and profits. Harvest does not have this association.
    Please note the text in blue. The words crop or crops are not always used in the light of profits and selling; however, here the word harvest is not used when the focus of the discussion is commerce, profits, and the selling of crops.

    Orange Blossom
     
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