Cross Patrick Avenue= Go over Patrick Avenue?

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gvergara

Senior Member
Español
<< Cross Patrick Avenue= Go over Patrick Avenue? >>

HI guys, I'd just like to confirm that instead of using the verb cross you can also say go over. Thanks a lot, cheers

G.
 
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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    That depends on what you want to say, Gvergara. As it stands, your question is probably too vague for people to give you a good answer. Can you think of any sentences you'd like to use with "cross" or "go over"? If you can, I'll bet people will give you better answers. If I were telling somebody to walk across Patrick Avenue, I sure wouldn't use "go over Patrick Avenue".
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    This seems to be an AE/BE thing.

    When I worked in London my colleagues frequently referred to the local pub (sadly now destroyed to make way for an office building) as "over the road" whereas my AE upbringing would require "across the street."

    So in answer to your question, the answer is "no" as far as American English is concerned.
     

    gvergara

    Senior Member
    Español
    Today I have to teach "giving directions in the city", and I always use the verb cross when talking about streets. Thing is, my confusion arose when I thought that you can well say go over the bridge (or am I wrong?) And I wouldn't say cross the bridge...
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Today I have to teach "giving directions in the city", and I always use the verb cross when talking about streets. Thing is, my confusion arose when I thought that you can well say go over the bridge (or am I wrong?) And I wouldn't say cross the bridge...
    You're changing the context here.

    Bridges are not roads.

    Bridges are built to go "over" something. Roads normally lie on the ground.

    You certainly can say "cross the bridge."

    There might be more ideas but we'll cross that bridge when we come to it. (An old, old English metaphor.)

    Just to confuse the issue, consider the old American popular song (1945) Cross Over the Bridge.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    If you would like our help, you need to supply complete sentences and context. I'm surprised anyone answered, but, as it is, we will wait for those before saying more on this vague subject.
     
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