Cross-reference in a glossary/dictionary

serroull

Member
English - Canada
I am writing a glossary. I would like to know if there is a term for a cross-reference within the present entry. The glossary has main entries and subentries. The familiar terms "above" "below" "supra" and "infra" are not suitable.
I need a term to complete "See ____ (the relevant subentry)".

Thank you.
 
  • roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    I know you can say:

    See/Refer to/Go to "X" (mention page #/table #) for more information/relevant information.

    The italics portion is optional to write.
     

    serroull

    Member
    English - Canada
    Thank you for your reply. My concern was to distinguish references to subentries within a main entry, and other main entries (where I say "see other entry"). I've settled on "see intra."
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    This is a late response, and I don't know whether this will be helpful, but the Chicago Manual of Style (14th ed.) recommends putting lower case see and the subheading in paretheses, much as your initial form in post #3. The subheading is lower case or capitalized in accordance with the entry in the glossary: (see other entry) or (see Other Entry). I don't think I have ever seen the additional direction "intra", though I don't oppose innovation.
     

    serroull

    Member
    English - Canada
    Each type of cross-reference is differently formatted (typeface and size) so the user of the glossary can identify each element at a glance. So references to other main entries has one style, and references to subentries within the main entry have another. Perhaps my "intra" is an innovation, but I think it's meaning will be clear to the reader. Thanks for your help.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I don't like "see intra"; it is an unnatural mixing of Latin and English. If you want to use "intra" (just as if you want to use "supra"), you really should use the Latin vide instead of the English "see". If you want to use "see", then use an English word after it:
    See above
    See below
    See within
     

    serroull

    Member
    English - Canada
    "see infra" and "see supra" are common in academic writing. Mixing English and Latin is not per se unnatural. My concern is the clarity of the term. I believe the reader will, from its use as a prefix in English, immediately recognize and understand "intra." I would not, of course, use it in a dissertation without permission; but my glossary is not subject to Turabian and her like.
     
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