crossed over into

danielxu85

Senior Member
Mandarin Chinese
Am I right that "crossed over into" means "made beach-head into"? Is it a common phrase? What kind of things could you "crossed over into"?

Names that were built purely on clothing have expanded their lines to include accessories from bags and belts to shoes and even jewellery, and brands with reputations built on jewellery, such as the Greek brand Folli Follie, have crossed over into fashion with the launch of a series of accessories.
 
  • GuitarMaestro

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi Daniel:

    "Crossing over" is not uncommon, but usually has specific usages, so I'd be careful where you use it. "Made beach-head into" I have never heard, so I don't know what that means.

    Crossing over refers to expanding into another genre, such as your jewelry company "crossing over" into handbags, for example. A typical usage is in music, or entertainment, such as when when a country musician "crosses over" into rock and roll.

    But like I said, it is not terribly common - it would not really be appropriate to say that Honda "crossed over" into the automobile business from the motorcycle business - although I can't explain why.

    Just be careful with all colloquial phrases, if you stick to more generally accepted mainstream English, you will always be fine.
     

    danielxu85

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    Thanks, Maestro! It's so nice seeing you on this forum again! Long time no see!

    Could you tell me what is the mainstream English version of "cross over"?
     

    GuitarMaestro

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi Daniel, thanks for the welcome back.

    The concept usually refers to "expanding into" another line of business. You might find that to be a better way to say it, although there are likely other ways that just aren't occurring to me at the moment.

    The technical marketing term for what you are referring to is called a "brand extension." That refers to using the same brand name for a completely different, but usually related, category of products. Typical examples are jewelry companies adding a perfume line, or say, a company that makes snow skis adding skiing clothing. You can probably find lots of examples with a Google search on "brand extension."
     
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