crosshairs

ManOfWords

Senior Member
Português [Brasil]
(The tactic itself involves utilizing quick reflexes to spot an enemy, center them on screen as best as possible, and then zoom into your scope only to then fire as soon as the crosshairs are visible.)

Hi all, I got this sentence from this link:
http://pt.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=quick%20scope [it is on the second meaning of quickscope]

I would like to know what 'crosshairs' mean there.

Thanks; =]
 
  • Greyfriar

    Senior Member
    Hello, ManofWords,


    I found this in the Merriam Webster dictionary -

    'used figuratively to describe someone or something being targeted as if through an aiming device having crosshairs'.

    In the given context I imagine it is where two very fine lines cross each other.

    Does this make sense?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In the given context, the meaning appears to be literal (as in the WRD and the first definition in M-W), not figurative, since it is literally an aiming device.
     

    ManOfWords

    Senior Member
    Português [Brasil]
    Hmm yes, it makes sense Greyfriar, thanks! Thanks everybody, but as I see it, don't know why, I understand that 'crosshairs' figuratively in my given example; :rolleyes:
     

    ManOfWords

    Senior Member
    Português [Brasil]
    I mixed meanings up, I mean, crosshairs can also mean a person who is the target, right?! that's what I mistakenly tagged 'figurative', because I thought that the [literal meaning] of it was the 'cross wires' seen through the scope. Understood sdgraham? :D
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Crosshairs" (or cross-wires) does not mean a person who is the target.

    The figurative usage is something like "I have you in my crosshairs," meaning that "I'm aiming at you," for whatever that might portend. It does not mean that I have you centered in the telescopic sight of my rifle, such as your quoted text suggests.
     

    ManOfWords

    Senior Member
    Português [Brasil]
    Hmm, now I don't know, I thought it could be because of Greyfriar's answer:

    (I found this in the Merriam Webster dictionary -

    'used figuratively to describe someone or something being targeted as if through an aiming device having crosshairs'.)

    [someone being targeted and not "targeting"] ... :cool: don't you think?

    (but now I see the figurative meaning) :)
     
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