cruise/excursion/trip/voyage/journey/travelling???

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Natuc

New Member
Argentina- español
hi! Is there anyone who could please tell me the difference beetwen trip, journey, travel, and all those words referring to the same??
thanks!!
:eek:
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "Travel" is a verb and refers to the action of moving, usually over a long distance.
    "Journey," "trip," and "voyage" are pretty much synonymous but they have different connotations. "Journey" implies a very long or tiresome trip. Example: his journey through the jungles of Africa. "Voyage" is also long but implies glamour and adventure. Example: Columbus' voyages across the Atlantic. "Trip" is neutral and can refer to long trips as well as shorter ones. I.e., my trip from America to Germany (by plane), or my trip to the grocery store (possibly 2 minutes by foot)

    Hope this helps.

    Interesting question.
     

    antonia2240

    New Member
    Bulgaria
    HI everybody,
    There are so many words for almost the same thing.
    Pls. explain me the all differences in great details.
    I`ve seen the similar question in the forum, but it is not
    circumstantial enough.
    Thanks a lot.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    That might well be beyond the capabilities/desire/commitment of the people (all volunteers) here, I think, antonia. You might just be asking too much of us.
    Try using the "English definition" part of the Dictionary Look up feature in the middle of the banner on the main screen.
     

    Bil

    Banned
    English USA
    Hi

    excursion, trip (also see "trip" below), journey and (to go) travelling: For the most part are of longer duration.

    tour: Usually means an agenda of planned stops.

    trip: You might take (or go for) a "day trip" or make a "short trip to the store" (informal)."

    cruise and voyage: At least on Earth are usually by sea. Although you can go for a cruise in/on a vehicle (car, bike, etc.), too.

    outing: An outing is usually for the day, let's say, to Sea World.

    ramble, ride, cruise or turn: Usually a drive or bike ride. Ramble is an informal, colorful expression; you might go for a ramble through woods on foot, too. (A ramble in the bushes, of course, might mean something else altogether).
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    "Travel" is a verb and refers to the action of moving, usually over a long distance.
    "Journey," "trip," and "voyage" are pretty much synonymous but they have different connotations. "Journey" implies a very long or tiresome trip. Example: his journey through the jungles of Africa. "Voyage" is also long but implies glamour and adventure. Example: Columbus' voyages across the Atlantic. "Trip" is neutral and can refer to long trips as well as shorter ones. I.e., my trip from America to Germany (by plane), or my trip to the grocery store (possibly 2 minutes by foot)
    I would like to ask about "voyage".
    I think voyage is referred to long travel only by ships or spaceships.

    Is it possible to call it a voyage to travel long distance by train, if it is glamor and adventurous?
    (I don't think so.)

    I don't think long travel by submarines are called "voyage", because it seems not glamor.
    What do you think? Is it possible to call a voyage to travel long distance by submarines?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    "Voyage to the bottom of the sea" sounds familiar :)
    I believe it was the title of a movie made about 50 years ago.
    Submarine voyages sound OK to me.
     
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