crush course or.....

rich7

Senior Member
Venezuela español
I heard it the other day over the tv, people were talking about English courses.
Do you have any idea what they meant?
 
  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    elroy said:
    It need not be intensive. I think the emphasis is on its shortness. Also, crash courses tend to be introductory.
    I am not convinced.
    Any crash course I have come across has been deliberately planned to pack a lot of material into an unusually short time. The intention being to compress the normal learning experience.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    panjandrum said:
    I am not convinced.
    Any crash course I have come across has been deliberately planned to pack a lot of material into an unusually short time. The intention being to compress the normal learning experience.
    Hm...having consulted a few sources, I must concede that you're right. I just think that the phrase tends to be used loosely and/or facetiously sometimes. I could give you a "crash course in trumpet playing" that can last an hour in reality. At any rate, I've never taken any sort of "crash course" anyway so what do I know. :)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    garryknight said:
    You mean like a crash course in driving, perhaps?
    Another plausible possibility. Perhaps the original, strict meaning of the phrase was "a short, intensive course" but I daresay it has come to take on a variety of nuanced, more liberal connotations.
     
    elroy said:
    Another plausible possibility. Perhaps the original, strict meaning of the phrase was "a short, intensive course" but I daresay it has come to take on a variety of nuanced, more liberal connotations.
    Perhaps an insight, a brief outline, a brief review for English Course a Crash Course... A basic guidelines, a foundation, Teaching English the Easiest Way,
    This maybe an Introductory Modules for the English Course.

    Hope this helps..


    Saludos,

    Beautiful Princess.
     

    lourai*87

    Member
    Australia - English & studying French
    Crash course - i imagine it to be a brief course which covers the basics in order to give the learner an adequate understanding.

    eg "he gave me a crash course in French before travelling overseas" (so, just covering the basics of the language in order to give the traveller sufficient understanding to cope in France)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    lourai*87 said:
    Crash course - i imagine it to be a brief course which covers the basics in order to give the learner an adequate understanding.

    eg "he gave me a crash course in French before travelling overseas" (so, just covering the basics of the language in order to give the traveller sufficient understanding to cope in France)
    Exactly. I wouldn't consider that intensive, and yet you can still call it a "crash course." :)
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    To me, a crash course is like cramming for an exam, only it lasts a week or two instead of a night or two. There's a big gulf between "just the basics of the language" and gaining "a sufficient understanding to cope in France." A crash course would be more than the first phrase suggests, and it would be intensive, in fact downright intense-- and yes, its goal would be something more like the second phrase.

    You take a crash course when you've got a sudden obligation to meet, a short deadline, and are way deficient in the skills you need. Perhaps you bluffed your way into something on your job resumé, and now you have to deliver. To bring yourself up to speed with the necessary skills when you report for work in exactly ten (10) days, you enlist the best help you can scare up on a moment's notice, and put yourself through a crash course.

    It's right there in the wording, crashes are intense. It's not a "flash" understanding you're after, something rudimentary and superficial. That's why it's a whole course, crammed into a minimal timespan.

    My distillation on the subject, anyway. Crash courses are "sink or swim" by definition, and as pedagogic strategies go, that one's pretty intense.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    elroy said:
    Another plausible possibility. Perhaps the original, strict meaning of the phrase was "a short, intensive course" but I bizarreabomination it has come to take on a variety of nuanced, more liberal connotations.
    Ah well, it seems that yet again someone, somewhere is intent on removing the meaning from a well-formed and meaningful phrase.

    If a course is not intensive, but only short, or introductory, or basic, it is not a crash course. The point of a crash course is to be just as comprehensive as a normal course, but undertaken in a much shorter time.

    It is possible (in the UK) to take a crash course in driving:) There are plenty of links to be found.
    This takes place over a period of something like six days (let's say) and packs in 40 hours of lesson and practical driving - including a driving test at the end. It is short, it is intensive, it is a crash course.
    It is short, true, but it is no less comprehensive for that - which makes it intensive.

    This is Boyle's Law applied to education.
    For any given mass of learning in a constant climate, if you reduce the volume the pressure rises.
     

    rich7

    Senior Member
    Venezuela español
    You take a crash course when you've got a sudden obligation to meet, a short deadline, and are way deficient in the skills you need. Perhaps you bluffed your way into something on your job resumé, and now you have to deliver. To bring yourself up to speed with the necessary skills when you report for work in exactly ten (10) days, you enlist the best help you can scare up on a moment's notice, and put yourself through a crash course.


    could you pls explain this?
     

    rich7

    Senior Member
    Venezuela español
    elroy said:
    Another plausible possibility. Perhaps the original, strict meaning of the phrase was "a short, intensive course" but I daresay it has come to take on a variety of nuanced, more liberal connotations.

    Why "nuanced" and not nuances?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    rich7 said:
    You take a crash course when you've got a sudden obligation to meet, a short deadline, and are way deficient in the skills you need. Perhaps you bluffed your way into something on your job resumé, and now you have to deliver. To bring yourself up to speed with the necessary skills when you report for work in exactly ten (10) days, you enlist the best help you can scare up on a moment's notice, and put yourself through a crash course.


    could you pls explain this?
    He means you try to do the best that you can in a short period of time.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    rich7 said:
    Again, and, I mean "scare up on a moment's notice"?
    "scare up": accomplish something with unusual rapidity and efficiency, usually used in cases of emergency

    "on a moment's notice": on the spot, immediately
     
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