crush <its> competition

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
Its? Whose? It looks as if to mean "of Crick's approach." But logically, it should have referred to the competition among various theories of mind-body problem.

I'm sorry you will have to read more in the source offered below.

***************
Crick, an atheist, wanted to eradicate belief in souls. <..............>
Crick’s neuro-reductionism, while dispiriting, clearly represented our best hope for self-knowledge, and for solving practical mind-body problems like mental illness. So I thought. I expected Crick’s approach to crush its competition and give mind-science the unifying paradigm it desperately needed. Science would grind mind down to purely physical processes, just as it had done with photosynthesis, heredity and other biological puzzles.

Source: John Hogan
 
  • NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    ...crush the competition of Crick's approach? Does it mean "don't argue about the validity of Crick's appraoch ("It's fine! Just accept it!")?
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    ...crush the competition of Crick's approach? Does it mean "don't argue about the validity of Crick's appraoch ("It's fine! Just accept it!")?
    The author expected Crick's way of finding a solution to be so successful that scientists would give up trying with other methods.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It would be so obviously true and answer so many experimental questions accurately that everyone else would realize it was a far superior method.

    Basically, what AnythingGoes said.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Crush the competition is a common phrase. The main meaning probably comes from sports and/or business where there is a score being kept (sport = points, business = sales). If you crush the competition you leave them far behind in points or sales.

    In this use it's a little less specific because there is no exact measure to keep score, but the idea is the same of being the clear winner in the competition. In this case, it's an intellectual competition of ideas.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    As I read it, it gives me the impression that it is positive. Can "Crush the competition" be used in negative cases to mean "destroy the proper competition"*?

    *Some Chinese translations have givens me this sense, hence the question.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top