cub reporter/policeman/teacher, etc.

audiolaik

Senior Member
Polish
Hi,

I've just learnt that the word "cub" can be used in reference to a young person being trained to become a professional journalist. My question is: Is this word (cub) limited only to the area of journalism? Can one say, for example, "cub teacher", "cub policeman" or "cub nurse"?

Thank you!

Audiolaik
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    As an added note, in 30-some years in the news business in the U.S., and the eight years since, I never heard anyone seriously called a "cub" reporter, much less applying the term to any other profession.

    The expression seems to be an anachronism at best.

    (Except of course, the professional ball players of the Chicago Cubs.:))

    We do have rookie policemen, but teachers and nurses, professions that require college educations these days, have no such modifiers that come to mind, although teachers are "student teachers" before they graduate and are practicing in a school.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Perhaps the two best-known:

    Jimmy Olsen:
    Jimmy is traditionally depicted as a bow tie-wearing, red-haired young man who works as a cub reporter and photographer for The Daily Planet, alongside Lois Lane and Clark Kent, whom he idolizes as career role models.
    and
    Ernest Hemingway
    : Hemingway worked as a journalist before becoming a novelist; after leaving high school he was hired as a cub reporter for The Kansas City Star, where he quickly learned that the truth often lurks below the surface of a story. Although he worked at the newspaper for only six months from October 17, 1917 to April 30, 1918, he relied on the Star's style guide as a foundation for his writing: "Use short sentences. Use short first paragraphs. Use vigorous English. Be positive, not negative."

    Quotes from the Wikipedia links for the names.
     

    KYC

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    We do have rookie policemen, but teachers and nurses, professions that require college educations these days, have no such modifiers that come to mind, although teachers are "student teachers" before they graduate and are practicing in a school.
    I am also wondering if it has a negative meaning when native speakers say "rookie policeman" or just a netural tone.
    Thanks a lot!
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The term cub reporter always reminds me of early Superman comics and the like.
    Quite true. There's a whole body of vocabulary in the English language that was spawned by comic books, cowboy films and early aviation film epics, for example - but isn't used in the industries or pastimes it is purported to represent.
     
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