cuisine de marrons / cuisine de blettes

< Previous | Next >
More food translation help please. When a meat or fish is prepared with an accompaniment described as "cuisine de" whatever it is, what's an appealing way of describing this? "cooked with chestnuts" or "cooked with greens" just doesn't sound too enticing....
 
  • Le Bélier

    Senior Member
    USA
    English/USA
    Tu cherche en anglais, n'est-ce pas? C'est simple, je le sais, mais que penses-tu de prepared with?
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    cuisine de marrons or de blettes (which I had first read as blattes :eek: because of your other thread about blood pudding) isn't proper French in any case, it ought to be cuisiné aux marrons or aux belettes blettes.
    So translate it any way you think fit, you won't be betraying any precious French cuisine concept.
    As far as I know, it does mean cooked with chestnut / beets and nothing else.
    Ask your chef for advice...
     
    Eh ben, the chef in question whose stuff I am translating is French, so I am happy to confirm my uncertainty of the translation. I think that both suggestions: prepared with or cooked with are good. Wouldn't "blettes" be some kind of "greens", collards, maybe, beet tops, etc. rather than beets. The reason I say that is because he uses the term "betteraves" elsewhere. Who knows, maybe he is using the beets in one recipe and the beet tops in another. Merci mille fois for your help.
     

    Milou

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Des blettes are different from des betteraves. It is a proper plant in itself (I think...) so it is not the top of the beet or something else.

    Une Blette

    Betterave = Beetroot
    Collard = feuille de chou
    chou = cabbage
     

    Suebethi

    Senior Member
    USA
    Hi all,
    Apparently collards are a pretty close translation to " blettes" or sometimes seen as "bettes" in French. It's a type of kale according to Merriam -Webster's. The taste has nothing to do with cabbage (Very faint flavor & usually cooked 'au gratin' yummmm)
     

    anangelaway

    Senior Member
    French
    Seulement pour en rajouter une petite couche. According to the latin name from Milou's link (Beta macrocarpa guss) it seems its equivalent in English would be : Wild beet.
    Beta macrocarpa Guss.

    SYNONYM(S) : Beta vulgaris L. subsp. macrocarpa (Guss.) Thell., Beta vulgaris L. var. macrocarpa (Guss.) Moq.
    ENGLISH : Wild beet. Source
    D'après cette source il s'agirait de la sous-famille Chenopodiacées, famille : Amaranthaceae.
    Il est vrai que les tiges/limbes et les feuilles de la betterave y ressemblent un peu/beaucoup - voir photo.

    In other sources, its equivalent seems to be ''wild Swiss chard'', used in various recipes.
     
    You all have been so helpful in this - I do appreciate it. The English-speaking audience/readers of this chef are mainly American, so I tend to use American usage rather than English. No insult intended and I find that I personally am learning a lot. Living half the year in Washington DC, a transplanted Southerner for the past 30 years, I think I shall use the term "greens" for the 'blettes' as there are different kinds of greens, including collards and kale and Swiss chard and even beet tops and I really don't know exactly what the chef is using. I have so many other questions for him that I try to keep the questions to a minimum when I really have no idea what he is talking about. Again, mille fois merci. A la prochaine.....
     

    Gez

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Hi all,
    Apparently collards are a pretty close translation to " blettes" or sometimes seen as "bettes" in French.
    Oui, c'est pas simple. Il y a les bettes, les raves, et les betteraves. Pour autant que je sache, "betterave" signifie en fait "racine de bette", puisque "rave" est "racine."

    Cependant, comme "rave" signifie "racine", si toutes les betteraves sont des bettes, toutes les raves ne sont pas des bettes !

    Un autre exemple de légume s'appelant simplement "racine" est le radis.
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    Pour autant que je sache, "betterave" signifie en fait "racine de bette", puisque "rave" est "racine."
    Bettes et betteraves sont deux plantes différentes. Il est impossible de se baser sur le nom vulgaire en botanique de toute manière, seul le nom latin est réellement utile par sa précision.
     

    Gez

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Bettes et betteraves sont deux plantes différentes. Il est impossible de se baser sur le nom vulgaire en botanique de toute manière, seul le nom latin est réellement utile par sa précision.
    Betterave signifie tout de même rave de bette, c'est à dire racine de bette. :p

    Et les deux plantes ont le même nom latin, beta vulgaris. Elles sont différentes, certes, mais ce sont de proches parentes. La différence est au niveau de la variété, pas de l'espèce.
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    Betterave signifie tout de même rave de bette, c'est à dire racine de bette. :p

    Et les deux plantes ont le même nom latin, beta vulgaris. Elles sont différentes, certes, mais ce sont de proches parentes. La différence est au niveau de la variété, pas de l'espèce.
    Tu as raison, et je viens de découvrir grâce à ton insistance que plus de 4000 internautes mangent des feuilles de betteraves. Moi qui les ai toujours jetées... je me demande si j'ai vraiment eu tort. :p
     

    timoun

    Senior Member
    France French
    Je pense que vous êtes en train de couper les cheveux en quatre. La traduction de bettes telle qu'elle apparaît ici même est: Beet, Swiss Chard. Beet ne plaît pas car "red beet" signifie "betterave". Consultons la définition anglaise de "chard" : on trouve: chard, Swiss chard, spinach beet, leaf beat:
    long succulent whitish stalks with large green leaves


    Il me semble que nous avons là la description exacte des bettes...Il y avait donc trois façons différentes de rendre le mot bettes de manière précise.
     

    candypole

    Senior Member
    australia english
    I won't try to join in the discussion about vegetables, but I have often seen in restaurants which are or try to be haute cuisine 'accompanied by' - for whatever sauces or vegetables accompany the meat (fish) dish.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top