Culture acquired through travel.

vimper200

New Member
Italian
Hi everybody!
Is this sentence grammatically correct? Does it make sense?

"Culture means to travel"
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    That (grammatically correct) sentence means "Culture currently intends to go on a trip somewhere," "Culture will plan a vacation."

    Is this the meaning you want your sentence to have? If not, what are you trying to say?
     

    vimper200

    New Member
    Italian
    The meaning I would like to express is "travelling you broaden your horizons/ travelling opens your mind" so generally "travelling will improve your culture"
    Maybe "Travelling means culture" sounds better?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    No. It is simply wrong. Nobody believes that travelling means culture. http://www.wordreference.com/definition/Culture Seriously, for every week you spend travelling, you probably absorb 3 minutes of culture.

    This sounds to me like a foreigner's attempt to create a "snappy slogan" by direct translation from another language - it doesn't work.

    The problem is that a clever slogan operates on two levels, "Travelling means culture" transparently means spend your money and become cultured - which is isn't so, because those to whom it would appeal will never be cultured. :D

    I advise you forget it. Try something more nebulous - "Travelling broadens the mind" "Travelling is like having a second soul" "Travelling is what you always wanted to do."

    Beware of this one
    "travelling will improve your culture"
    My culture is the culture of England - my travelling will not improve the culture of England. (Though, God knows, it could do with some improvement.)
     

    vimper200

    New Member
    Italian
    Alright, I am going to use "travelling opens your mind"

    PS: It's for an exchange program and I do believe that culture opens your mind, probably "culture" has a slightly different meaning from the Italian "cultura". I did not mean the characteristics of a particular social, ethnic or political group. I meant the knowledge, the education and ideas of a person (eg. knowing another language, being educated, being a man of learning)
     

    R1chard

    Senior Member
    UK
    British English
    Although "travelling opens your mind" is grammatically correct I would favour "Travel broadens your horizons".

    "Travel" suggests the whole concept of getting to, seeing and being in other places whereas "travelling" suggests the action of getting from one place to another e.g. "travelling on a bus", "travelling to Canada". The action of travelling is unlikely to improve your cultural understanding.

    To me "Travel opens your mind" is challengeable. Has it been proven? "Travel broadens your horizons" is a truism in the sense that the more you travel the more horizons you see, and "broadens your horizons" is another way of saying "opens your mind" so even if travel doesn't actually improve your ability to absorb culture then no one can argue that it doesn't literally broaden your horizons.

    Hope that makes sense.

    Richard
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Culture has many senses in English, one of which is the meaning to which you allude. We talk of 'people possessing culture', 'people being cultured', and 'people being cultivated'.

    From post#1, it looked as though you were looking something rather epigrammatic, like 'travel cultivates'.

    Later you've said you're going to use 'travelling opens your mind' ... I'd recommend the standard (hackneyed) form: 'travel broadens the mind'. (Cross-posted with R1chard)
     

    vimper200

    New Member
    Italian
    In this case I'll go for 'travel broadens the mind' or "Travel broadens your horizons"

    To me "Travel opens your mind" is challengeable. Has it been proven? "Travel broadens your horizons" is a truism in the sense that the more you travel the more horizons you see, and "broadens your horizons" is another way of saying "opens your mind" so even if travel doesn't actually improve your ability to absorb culture then no one can argue that it doesn't literally broaden your horizons.

    Hope that makes sense.

    Richard
    Regarding the truth or not of this idiom: in my context it is supposed to be true (hopefully) being an education program/exchange organised by an university XD
    Thank you everybody again
     
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