curl up, huddle up, snuggle up, cuddle up

stephenlearner

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

I have read some threads about these words.
It seems that curl up and huddle up often imply a person bends his body, for warmth or out of pain, etc.
On the contrary, snuggle up and cuddle up meanthat generally two persons hold together, not necessarily implying their bodies are bended.

The bear curled up for warmth.
That boy huddled up in the armchair.
The girl snuggled up to her mother.
The man cuddled up with his wife when they slept.

Do you think so?

By the way, why are huddle, cuddle, snuggle? Are they related etymologically?
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    This one seems a little bogus to me: 'That boy huddled up in the armchair.' It makes the armchair seem cold and forbidding. Your other examples work for me.

    The etymologies of huddle, cuddle are obscure, but the words rhyme; but then they also rhyme with puddle and muddle. Snuggle derives from 'snug'.
     

    gramman

    Senior Member
    >>It makes the armchair seem cold and forbidding.

    Perhaps, but this construction is found in literature:
    The man sat huddled up in his chair, with his head sunk upon his breast, like one who is utterly crushed. — A Case of Identity by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, on yankeeweb.com
    Max was huddled up in his chair, staring at Veda, who stared back at him. —
    You Never Know With Women, by James Hadley Chase
    These several discoveries she shared daily with a faded old mother who sat huddled up in a rocking-chair by the stove, winter and summer, whether it had any fire in it or not. — The Tides of Barnegat, by F. Hopkinson Smith, on Project Gutenberg
    He sat behind his desk, all huddled up in his chair, staring at the class … — Death on the Installment Plan, by Louis-Ferdinand Céline
    He sat huddled up in his chair staring in front of him long after William had gone jauntily on his way. — Just William, by Richmal Crompton, on Project Gutenberg
     
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    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    It didn't decry the construction, merely noted that it stood out from the others by dint of its lack of cosiness. Your examples strike me as similarly desolate.
     
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