currency vs coin

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Crawford Powell

Senior Member
Native Arabic speaker from "Egypt"
-What's the difference between (Currency & Coin) in the following example:
  • The official (Currency/Coin) in "America" is the dollar
 
  • dermott

    Senior Member
    B.E. via Australian English
    The official currency in America is the dollar.

    Currency
    is the general term applied to a country's money. A coin is a coin, an individual unit of currency; for example, a 50c coin.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The currency is the dollar; you can also say the currency is 100 cents = 1 dollar. The coins have different values: there is a 1c coin, a 5c coin, a 10c coin, a 25c coin, and so on.
     

    Crawford Powell

    Senior Member
    Native Arabic speaker from "Egypt"
    -So, The (Dollar, Euro, Pound... etc) are currencies but (50 Dollars, 1 Euro or 300 Pounds) are coins, Right?

    -I guess if there are no numbers precede the money like this (Dollar, Euro, Pound... etc) this's suppose to be called a currency... But, If there are numbers precede the money like this (50 Dollars, 1 Euro, 300 Pounds.. etc) this's suppose to be called a coin, Right?
     

    dermott

    Senior Member
    B.E. via Australian English
    If you see reference to the Euro, the Dollar, etc, it means the currency.

    Coins are designated by their individual value. A 1 dollar coin, a 1 Euro coin, a 2 Euro coin, etc. There is no 50 dollar coin, nor is there a 300 pound coin.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    A coin is a small, round piece of metal. The USA has a 1c coin and a 5c coin, but not a 2c or 3c coin. The amount of money 3c has to be made of three coins: three 1c coins add up to the amount of 3c.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    A coin is a small, round piece of metal.
    Just to add that it might occasionally be in other shapes (square, hexagonal, etc).

    They are usually the lower denominations that get handled a lot. Sometimes the term piece is also used in BrE - 20p piece, 50p piece.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    -What's the difference between (Currency & Coin) in the following example:
    The main difference is "age" - "currency" is the uncountable noun used to described the money used in a particular country. About 250 years ago, coin was also used uncountably to simply mean "money", 1735 G. (OED: Berkeley Querist §475 Wealth is really power, and coin a ticket conveying power.), but in that form was a close synonym for currency.
     
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