cursi

luzazul

New Member
Argentina/Español
Ciao a tutti!!! I've been looking for this word everywhere, but i can't find the right translation, slang or whatever, Does anyone know the english word for "cursi"? :p

Gracias!!!
 
  • Maeron

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I'd call it "tacky", "cheesy", "kitschy". In other words, "in questionable taste".

    In his book Cassell's Colloquial Spanish, A. Bryson Gerrard explains his British take on the word:

    "A colloquial but widely used adjective meaning something like 'socially pretentious'; it describes people who give themselves the airs of a higher social class, non-U pretending to be U. When applied to things, e.g. furniture of clothes, it contains the idea of noveau-riche. High-class houses in the best Spanish tradition are furnished with an aristocratic simplicity and restraint, and the gaudy, ornate Empire-style furniture which you sometimes find in city apartments would be described as cursi. I once heard a Spaniard say of a friend's tie ¡Qué corbata más cursi! He was being facetious but i wondered what an Anglo-Saxon might have said ... 'What a fancy tie!' ... 'What a pansy tie!' ... perhaps 'What a ghastly tie! since it was not a compliment. Affectation, pretentiousness, excessive ornamentation are all involved."
     

    luzazul

    New Member
    Argentina/Español
    Thank you, Maeron, but i might not been clear, i am looking for a word for this definition: when you talk a lot about love, you are more than romantic, almost sickly.
    There might not be a word, but a phrase or way of saying it, i would appreciate your help a lot.
     

    Vicki

    Senior Member
    United States/English
    luzazul said:
    i am looking for a word for this definition: when you talk a lot about love, you are more than romantic, almost sickly.
    A good word for this is "mushy".

    Vicki
     

    Maeron

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Thanks for the clarification, luzazul. It's a perfect example of how we need to give the fullest explanation possible when we're asking for a translation. My suggestions of "tacky", "cheesy" or "kitschy" would be the words I'd recommend for "cursi" if you were applying it to someone's furniture, decoration or clothes.

    With the further explanation you gave, I agree with Vicki that "mushy" is the best word. Another possible one could be "corny". Here's an example where you can see it used this way: http://www.funegreets.com/love/luv56.htm.
     

    Lluna1977

    Senior Member
    Catalan / Spanish
    Hola...

    Alguien podría traducirme la palabra CURSI...
    En el diccionario solo me aparece pretentious, y me suena demasiado formal...
    Hay alguna forma coloquial de decirlo?

    Gracias :p
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    Lluna1977 said:
    Hola...

    Alguien podría traducirme la palabra CURSI...
    En el diccionario solo me aparece pretentious, y me suena demasiado formal...
    Hay alguna forma coloquial de decirlo?

    Gracias :p
    It could also be translated as 'snobby' or 'snooty'
    En punjabi (el idioma de mis padres) 'cursi' significa 'silla' ;) , but that's not the answer to your question!.
     

    Tormenta

    Senior Member
    Argentina-Español
    paultucker79 said:
    Twee means "overly precious" or "nice" . However I'm pretty sure I have never used it in my speaking life so on that basis I would say you need not worry about it!

    What is wrong with being "overly precious" ? ;)
     

    suso26

    Senior Member
    Spanish México.
    Hello, I would like you to help me on this..
    I havent found yet the correct translation for: "cursi" into english..

    I hope some can help me..

    Thanks
     

    suso26

    Senior Member
    Spanish México.
    Gracias!!..

    I think the most apropriate is: tacky.. thanks"

    so, mm snobbish would be better you say.. wouldnt it be?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    suso26 said:
    Hello, I would like you to help me on this..
    I havent found yet the correct translation for: "cursi" into english..

    I hope some can help me..

    Thanks

    Hi Suso, once I wrote a story for my English class, and the teacher after marking it with a C said "it is so corny!!!!". Since I didn't know the word at that moment, I asked her and she in a perfect, cruel, direct Spanish said: "CURSI". Well, I'm not sure whether this is so or she just wanted to hit me where it hurts... :(
     

    Chanin

    New Member
    Dominican Republic - Spanish
    Lluna I believe that "tasteless" will fit better with the meaning of "cursi".
    Let's see if anyone else have something different.
     

    danlewe

    New Member
    UK, English
    there's no direct translation, in some contexts I like 'cutesy', but in many cases the best translation, at least in British English, is 'sentimental'. That has all the negative connotations that 'cursi' has and is perfect if you're talking about words.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Having read through and participated in many previous threads on this,
    I agree with Suso...Tacky is fairly close in meaning and tone. It implies
    both the 'corniness' of the comment from Artrella's teacher, and a general lack of good taste.

    cheers,
    Cuchuflete
     

    Vlad

    New Member
    mexico spanish
    suso26 said:
    Hello, I would like you to help me on this..
    I havent found yet the correct translation for: "cursi" into english..

    I hope some can help me..

    Thanks
    hello Suso ...
    you might use the word " cursi " for a person (mostly youth girls ) who is extremely romantic, who likes to hear soft music, likes candies and uses pink pens, draws hearts in their notebooks, who likes to give scented letters, etc,
    Would be "honeyed" one of the most accurate words for it´s definition.
    Hope it helps-
    Vlad
     

    mgarey

    Senior Member
    USA; English
    Hola Suso,
    In addition to 'corney', I've also heard 'cheesy' as an equivalent for 'cursi'. I'd also agree with Yop that 'hortera' is a good tranlation for 'tacky'.
    Saludos,
    Michelle
     

    lilboychuck

    New Member
    English (United States)
    I've also heard that cursi can be used for "flattery." Has anyone else heard it used like this before?

    --Invictus--
     

    lilboychuck

    New Member
    English (United States)
    I think it can be used for corny as well. What i am trying to really figure out is if there is a difference between the definition of "cursi" from mexico/latin america and Spain.

    Any genius have the answer :)
     

    prubi916

    Member
    English
    Lluna1977 said:
    Hola...

    Alguien podría traducirme la palabra CURSI...
    En el diccionario solo me aparece pretentious, y me suena demasiado formal...
    Hay alguna forma coloquial de decirlo?

    Gracias :p
    Hola! Creo que una buena tracuccion cologuial seria en ingles: "stuck-up," "snooty," y aun "arrogant."

    De: P. Rubi, Phoenix, Arizona EE.UU.
     

    Jhorer Brishti

    Senior Member
    United States/Bangladesh English/Bengali
    Cómo se traduciría "cheesy" o "corny" porque así pensaba que significaba la palabra cursi.
     

    3.1416

    Senior Member
    bueno, en México usamos 'cursi' para todas esas palabras arriba mencionadas, a mi tambien me costo mucho relacionarlas
    Well, here in México we use 'cursi' for all the above described.
     

    Yael

    Senior Member
    US
    Argentina, Spanish
    Yo creo que cheesy incluye el significado de cursi, pero va mas allá. Algo cursi siempre es cheesy, pero no todo lo cheesy es cursi!!
    How about sappy? en el sentido de overly romantic and ....... cheesy!!
     

    Railway

    Senior Member
    Spain
    Yo siempre he pensado que se decia corny.

    Y eso dice WR
    corny ['kɔ:nɪ] adjetivo cursi, sentimental

    Cheesy lo he descubierto hoy, pero WR dice lo mismo
    cheesy adj cursi

    De las que me acuerdo ahora que he visto en este thread: Tacky, snooty, arrogant. Creo que ninguna significa cursi.

    Saludos a todos!
     

    Germanazo

    Member
    Spanish, Castellano
    hello Suso ...
    you might use the word " cursi " for a person (mostly youth girls ) who is extremely romantic, who likes to hear soft music, likes candies and uses pink pens, draws hearts in their notebooks, who likes to give scented letters, etc,
    Would be "honeyed" one of the most accurate words for it´s definition.
    Hope it helps-
    Vlad
    yees. i think thats the real meaning of "cursi" in spanish, but, it also have other meanings though this is the most popular.
    i think the best words are:
    • honeyed
    • corny
    • cheese
    • stuck-up
    • snooty
    and a problem i find in the forum is that some people think "cursi" is "hortera" and it has nothing to do with "cursi". some people talk about "cursi" and says it means tacky (i think is hortera). and back to front, other people say "hortera" is "cursi". please, be informed of what you say. sometimes the problem is that some people are from america and other are from europe (spain), so maybe the problem is that the same word means diferents things depending the country. well, i guess thats all i wanted to say:) . i hope not to hurt the feelins of anybody. cause maybe somebody could take it bad. i hope you all wont. and the last thing; correct me if im wrong in any meaning or anything.

    thanks a bunch
     

    barbalib

    Member
    Chile - Castellano
    yees. i think thats the real meaning of "cursi" in spanish, but, it also have other meanings though this is the most popular.
    i think the best words are:
    • honeyed
    • corny
    • cheese
    • stuck-up
    • snooty
    and a problem i find in the forum is that some people think "cursi" is "hortera" and it has nothing to do with "cursi". some people talk about "cursi" and says it means tacky (i think is hortera). and back to front, other people say "hortera" is "cursi". please, be informed of what you say. sometimes the problem is that some people are from america and other are from europe (spain), so maybe the problem is that the same word means diferents things depending the country. well, i guess thats all i wanted to say:) . i hope not to hurt the feelins of anybody. cause maybe somebody could take it bad. i hope you all wont. and the last thing; correct me if im wrong in any meaning or anything.

    thanks a bunch
    Hi, I've never heard the word hortera, but as far as how RAE defines it, i think it has something to do with cursi. I don't think it's a matter of being informed, as you say, languaje is so flexible that words can have different meanings depending where you are on planet Earth (yet). That's why we show where we are from. Btw, hortera doesn't have a known origin, so it's dificult to find the real meaning of it, i guess.

    And cursi... wow... that's an interesting word.

    Saludos!

    :)

    B.
     

    willy simpson

    Member
    español
    Hey lads! how are you today?, I hope terrific!
    Let me express what I think of this word
    1. I see no way to translate this word into English in a simple way, remember, the meaning is given by the context where the word is being used, for example, in latin America we started to use the word "lapicero" instead of the correct word "bolígrafo", and it became so popular that the "RAE" had to accep it
    2. For those spanish learners, let me give you an example of a "cursi" guy
    a- A "cursi" guy usually send flowers and poems to his girlfriend
    b- He uses words like : my littlen bunnyn, my pumking, sugar blossom, littlie birdie and all kind of "cursi words" that is tell; a cursi guy uses ridiculous names to call his girlfriend
    c- and Finally, the word "cursi" has usually a negative connotation" a few guys want to be called "cursi", however, not all the time it has a negative connotation
    Cursi has some relationship with ridiculous, and I stress SOME
     

    Germanazo

    Member
    Spanish, Castellano
    Hi, I've never heard the word hortera, but as far as how RAE defines it, i think it has something to do with cursi. I don't think it's a matter of being informed, as you say, languaje is so flexible that words can have different meanings depending where you are on planet Earth (yet). That's why we show where we are from. Btw, hortera doesn't have a known origin, so it's dificult to find the real meaning of it, i guess.

    And cursi... wow... that's an interesting word.

    Saludos!

    :)

    B.

    hmm, really?:D i didnt know hortera has to do with cursi ...amazing... and pardon me if i said "informed" cause, yes, it sounds exaggerated and arrogant:eek:. i know language is flexible... now im begginin to understand why so many people say tacky is cursi... cuase they think cursi is hortera, hahaha. What a MESSSSSS!!!. if it helps, cursi in spain is when anybody (specially young girls) is extremely sweet, delicate, fussy, usually wears clothes of pink, likes poems.... and hortera (and i repeat, here in spain) is the opposite. is the one that doesnt wears well AT ALL. i dont know what it means in america. maybe somethinglike cursi....

    Hey lads! how are you today?, I hope terrific!
    Let me express what I think of this word
    1. I see no way to translate this word into English in a simple way, remember, the meaning is given by the context where the word is being used, for example, in latin America we started to use the word "lapicero" instead of the correct word "bolígrafo", and it became so popular that the "RAE" had to accep it
    2. For those spanish learners, let me give you an example of a "cursi" guy
    a- A "cursi" guy usually send flowers and poems to his girlfriend
    b- He uses words like : my littlen bunnyn, my pumking, sugar blossom, littlie birdie and all kind of "cursi words" that is tell; a cursi guy uses ridiculous names to call his girlfriend
    c- and Finally, the word "cursi" has usually a negative connotation" a few guys want to be called "cursi", however, not all the time it has a negative connotation
    Cursi has some relationship with ridiculous, and I stress SOME
    Yeah....:tick:
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Basenjigirl

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    "cursi" is the "Amo a Laura" video from last year. If you don't know what I'm talking about, do a search on YouTube for the video. Cursi is NOT snotty or snobby.
     

    laylandrogyn

    New Member
    mexico español
    well in mexico, cursi is more like corny and mushy. Here, it´s not used to describe sth or someone with questionable taste, but to call things like that ridiculous poem, jaja.
     

    Deepsan

    New Member
    Español...colombia
    Hola a todos,
    para los que conocen la palabra cursi, me podrían ayudar con una traducción de esta??
    Gracias
     
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