customers from home and abroad

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Chinese Su

Senior Member
Chinese
I am studying the difference between these three phrases, and I have no idea if I have understood correctly. Thank you :)

1. We sincerely welcome customers from home and abroad. :tick:
= ... customers from the country where the speaker is from [the speaker's nationality] and customers from abroad.

2. We sincerely welcome customers from here and abroad. :tick:
= ... customers from the country where the speaker is [the speaker's current location] and customers from abroad.

3. We sincerely welcome customers at home and abroad. :confused::thumbsdown:
= ... customers both when they are in their own countries and when they are abroad.
 
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  • BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    We welcome people from (around the world).
    or
    We welcome the ambassador of/from XXX.

    ...welcome customers from here and abroad.:tick:
     

    Chinese Su

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    We welcome people from (around the world).
    or
    We welcome the ambassador of/from XXX.

    ...welcome customers from here and abroad.:tick:
    Thanks so much for you reply, BLUEGLAZE :D

    Are you implying that 1 is not idiomatic? If so, why not? Also, I have no idea if I have understood correctly :confused:

    I am desperate to know the real meanings of these three sentences using "from home and abroad", " from here and abroad", and "at home and abroad" respectively, which have baffled me for so long... Thank you :)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    In this context I'd use 'domestic' and 'international'.

    'Domestic' refers to "Commercial activities conducted within a nation or a commercial entity that conducts economic transactions inside the borders of its home nation".

    However I have no experience of the business world.

    There's the same problem as with the mountain climbers.
     

    Chinese Su

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In this context I'd use 'domestic' and 'international'.

    'Domestic' refers to "Commercial activities conducted within a nation or a commercial entity that conducts economic transactions inside the borders of its home nation".

    However I have no experience of the business world.
    I see!!! Thanks so much for your help, Hermione Golightly :D

    We sincerely welcome domestic and international customers. :tick:

    I have just come up with a new set of sentences :) However, I have no idea if I have understood correctly :confused:

    1. The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for visitors from home and abroad. :tick:
    = ... visitors from the country where the speaker is from [= the speaker's nationality] and visitors from abroad.

    2. The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for visitors from here and abroad. :tick:
    = ... visitors from the country where the speaker is [= the speaker's current location] and visitors from abroad.

    3. The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for visitors at home and abroad. :confused::thumbsdown:
    = ... visitors both when they are in their own countries and when they are abroad.

    I am desperate to know the real meanings of these three sentences using "from home and abroad", " from here and abroad", and "at home and abroad" respectively, which have baffled me for so long... Thank you :)
     
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    BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    'from home and abroad' is the most common. This is good in a letter or on a web page.
    'from here and abroad' is good if I am at (whatever location) talking to a group of visitors. 'Here' is a little to specific, though, most of the time.
    Does it mean from this city or the whole country? Usually it means the general area not the country in general.
    'At home' doesn't fit in your context. Those of you at home, come on in. We welcome you. Sounds a bit like a local commercial.
     

    Chinese Su

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    'from home and abroad' is the most common. This is good in a letter or on a web page.
    'from here and abroad' is good if I am at (whatever location) talking to a group of visitors. 'Here' is a little to specific, though, most of the time.
    Does it mean from this city or the whole country? Usually it means the general area not the country in general.
    'At home' doesn't fit in your context. Those of you at home, come on in. We welcome you. Sounds a bit like a local commercial.
    Thanks so much for your further clarification, BLUEGLAZE :D

    I have amended some descriptions (highlighted in bold) according to your feedback!

    However, I would also like to know if I have understood correctly :confused: Thank you :)

    1. The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for visitors from home and abroad. :tick:
    = ... visitors from the country where the speaker is from [= the speaker's nationality] and visitors from abroad.
    (P.S. 'from home and abroad' is the most common. This is good in a letter or on a web page.)

    2. The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for visitors from here and abroad. :tick:
    = ... visitors from the specific area where the speaker is and visitors from abroad.

    3. The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for visitors at home and abroad. :thumbsdown:
    = ... visitors both when they are in their own countries and when they are abroad. (P.S. 'At home' doesn't fit in this context.)
     

    BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Instead of 'here', I prefer - The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for visitors from across/throughout Taiwan and abroad.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Why not forget about 'at home', except for the basic meaning whcih reflects '(your/my etc) house/family'?
    I don't understand why you need to make a distinction. It's easy to write 'for all visitors, (wherever they are from).
    Or simply use 'Taiwanese as well as foreign visitors', or 'whether Taiwanese or from abroad'.
    I really don't think the present approach is the best way to learn these subtle differences. It reminds me a little of an educational toy called a 'posting box'.

    Five Tops Posting Box - Cognitive Puzzle Toy

    Maybe the problem is that 'at home' and '(from) abroad' refer to where people are not who they are.
    If you say 'people at home', well, I am right now 'at home', in my home, where I live, in England. I am not 'abroad' or 'from abroad'. It happens that I am English, but there have been many times in my life when I have been 'at home', wherever I'm living at that time, but not in the UK.
    Even if I were living in Taiwan, I would not be who you mean by 'at home'.
     

    Chinese Su

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Instead of 'here', I prefer - The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for visitors from across/throughout Taiwan and abroad.
    Why not forget about 'at home', except for the basic meaning whcih reflects '(your/my etc) house/family'?
    I don't understand why you need to make a distinction. It's easy to write 'for all visitors, (wherever they are from).
    Or simply use 'Taiwanese as well as foreign visitors', or 'whether Taiwanese or from abroad'.
    I see! Thank you so much, BLUEGLAZE and Hermione Golightly :D

    1. The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for visitors from across/throughout Taiwan and abroad. :tick:
    2. The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for all visitors, wherever they are from. :tick:
    3. The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for Taiwanese as well as foreign visitors. :tick:
    4. The museum provides an excellent cultural experience for all visitors, whether Taiwanese or from abroad. :tick:
     
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    Chinese Su

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I really don't think the present approach is the best way to learn these subtle differences. It reminds me a little of an educational toy called a 'posting box'. Five Tops Posting Box - Cognitive Puzzle Toy
    Yes, you are right, Hermione Golightly! From these two experiences (this and 'the mountain climbers'), I have decided to learn English in a more natural way. For example, undergraduate students from home and abroad Thank you again for your great patience with me! You have helped me a lot :D

    Maybe the problem is that 'at home' and '(from) abroad' refer to where people are not who they are.
    If you say 'people at home', well, I am right now 'at home', in my home, where I live, in England. I am not 'abroad' or 'from abroad'. It happens that I am English, but there have been many times in my life when I have been 'at home', wherever I'm living at that time, but not in the UK.
    Even if I were living in Taiwan, I would not be who you mean by 'at home'.
    Thanks so much for your elaboration on the usage of "at home", Hermione Golightly :D

    However, I am a little confused by the last two sentences. I'm not sure if I have understood correctly. Thank you :)

    1. "but there have been many times in my life when I have been 'at home', wherever I'm living at that time, but not in the UK"

    'at home' = at the the house, apartment, or place where you are living

    2. "Even if I were living in Taiwan, I would not be who you mean by 'at home'."

    'at home' = at the place where you came from or where you usually live
     
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