cut in lane or move over lane

brown poodle

Senior Member
korean
Does cut in lane and move over lane have the same or similar meaning and can be used interchangeably ?

( when he drives)
He always follows the car in front very closely because he doesn't want no one cut in his lane/or he doesn't want no one move over into his lane .
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    He always follows the car in front [of him] very closely because he doesn't want anyone to cut into his lane / to cut in front of him.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    That's not how we use "cut in".

    It can be used absolutely (= with no object): He always follows the car in front very closely because he doesn't want anyone to cut in.
    OR
    It can be used with a prepositional phrase following it, as: He always follows the car in front very closely because he doesn't want anyone to cut in in front of him/to cut in on him/to cut in into his lane.

    Since all the last three have in + preposition they might sound odd. So your idea ... he doesn't want anyone to move over into his lane is a good one, and so is Newt's #2.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Does cut in lane and move over lane have the same or similar meaning
    The meanings are similar, but not the same.

    To cut in implies that the movement is intentionally aggressive and/or rude or impolite.
    To move (the "over" is not required) is neutral.

    (As has been pointed out, your examples have multiple errors.)
     
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