cut off or cut off from?

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skydown13

Senior Member
Mandarin
1. I cut off the picture from the catalog and paste it on my own Word document.
2. I cut the picture off the catalog and paste it on my own Word document.
3. I cut the picture off from the catalog and paste it on my own Word document.

Are above sentences correct?

<< Second question deleted >>
 
Last edited:
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I would use "off of".

    I cut the picture/image off of the catalog/Internet/Google and pasted it into my own Word file.
     

    loghrat

    Senior Member
    British English / Danish
    I would say, "I cut the picture out​ of the catalog and pasted it into my own word file."
    I would only use 'cut the picture out of the catalogue' for literally cutting out a picture (with scissors) form a paper catalog. (But maybe that's just me?)
    In computer terms, I would say 'I copied and pasted it form (name of site)' or 'I got it from ...'.
    People also say 'I got it off ...'.

    Note that off of is AE (not BE).
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    skydown. We require context. Your sentences are meaningless. How can you cut a picture from, off, off of, or out of a catalog (usually a book, printed on paper), and paste it into a word file? What is a "word file"? Do you mean a "Word document"? What action are you trying to describe?

    I have deleted your second question.

    Your second post was unacceptable - see Rule 8 about bumping.

    Andygc, moderator.
     

    skydown13

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    How would you say it in computer terms? I used the "Cut" command to acquire a picture from electronic catalog and I pasted it on the Word document.

    I cut the picture off of the catalog?
    I got the picture off the catalog?
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Both are fine, in American English.
    -- I cut the picture off of the (online/electronic) catalog ... and pasted ...
    -- I got the picture off (of) the (online/electronic) catalog ... and pasted ...
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I would advise against using the expression 'off of'. The word 'of' is not needed, since saying 'off' on its own already expresses the meaning. In UK usage, 'off of' is regarded as simply incorrect.

    Thus if you use 'off' on its own, you still make your meaning clear and unproblematic to an American audience. However, if you say 'off of', then to those educated in the British tradition you may appear to be uneducated or ill-educated. Bear in mind that the British educational tradition covers a larger population around the world, not just British native speakers.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    This thread is not an opportunity to reopen the topic of the use of "off" and "off of" which has been dealt with at length elsewhere in this forum.

    Andygc, moderator
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    To me (and this is my understanding of how the commands work in most computer programs), you're not "cutting" something unless it's deleted from the original. I don't think you're doing that with an online catalog. I think you probably copied the picture from the catalog and pasted it into your document.
     
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