cutting (flowers)

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dec-sev

Senior Member
Russian
Hallo.

This sort (of flowers) is perfect for cutting / is grown for cutting.

It’s a literal translation from Russian. “Cutting” in this case is a word used by those who grow flowers and “is grown for cutting” means “is grown to be cut and later put into a vase” It’s something opposed to so called “alive flowers” or flowers that grow in the pot.

So, is there in English something close to the Russian “cutting”? It would be nice if you could propose something laconic so that I could finish the sentence “This sort is perfect for [an English word for the Russian “cutting]”.
 
  • ><FISH'>

    Senior Member
    British English
    I do not believe something like that exists in common English. Garden or flower enthusiasts might have their own recognisable terms for it, but certainly the average person would not understand any such word should it exist.
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    As a gardener, I can confirm that it would sound natural to say:

    These flowers are perfect for cutting.

    It would be understood to mean "These flower stems are good for cutting and putting in a vase because they are long-lasting and/or have long stems"
     

    Wynn Mathieson

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    I am surprised by FISH's answer. Unless I have totally misunderstood the question, the English expression is ...flowers for cutting.

    Google "flowers for cutting" and you will find multiple examples. "Cut flowers" can even sometimes be used (perhaps not altogether logically, but perfectly understandably) to mean flowers for cutting, even before they are cut.

    E.g.
    I like to use one of my beds at the allotment for cut flowers so that I can enjoy fresh flowers at home during the summer.

    So: "This sort is perfect for cutting". No problem!
     
    Last edited:

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    Hallo.

    This sort (of flowers) is perfect for cutting / is grown for cutting.

    It’s a literal translation from Russian. “Cutting” in this case is a word used by those who grow flowers and “is grown for cutting” means “is grown to be cut and later put into a vase” It’s something opposed to so called “alive flowers” or flowers that grow in the pot.

    So, is there in English something close to the Russian “cutting”? It would be nice if you could propose something laconic so that I could finish the sentence “This sort is perfect for [an English word for the Russian “cutting]”.
    This sort of flower is perfect for cutting:tick: / is grown for cutting.:tick:

    I see nothing wrong with your sentence as it stands provided the reference to flowers is made explicit. I say this because the term "cutting" has two senses:
    1) That which you require - a plant which is good for producing cut flowers (noun).
    2) We also say "I grew this plant from a cutting." We take cuttings of geraniums, carnations, vines... all of which are suitable plants for taking cuttings from.

    Note that "cutting" in sense 2) is a noun, which is why it can take an artical (a or the) before it or the plural form (cuttings).

    We do not, however, grow new plants from cut flowers so your meaning is clear.
     
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