Cymraeg (Welsh): lover

Roguefemme

New Member
US, English
I want to use the term "carwr" in my fiction, but just to be safe I looked it up in a dictionary site and turned up this:

carwr [carwyr, m.](n.) lover, wooer Okay, does this mean "carwr" is female and "carwyr" male, or are they both masculine? If the latter, then what is the female version?

While I'm at it, what are the exact implications of the term? From what I have gathered, it's not disresepectful, but might be a bit racy, intended more for private use than in front of others. Is that right? (The character using it is a native speaker, so I want to be sure I'm not using it incorrectly.)

Are there any Welsh speakers here who might help me with this? Thank you so much!
 
  • Wynn Mathieson

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    I want to use the term "carwr" in my fiction, but just to be safe I looked it up in a dictionary site and turned up this:

    carwr [carwyr, m.](n.) lover, wooer Okay, does this mean "carwr" is female and "carwyr" male, or are they both masculine? If the latter, then what is the female version?

    While I'm at it, what are the exact implications of the term? From what I have gathered, it's not disresepectful, but might be a bit racy, intended more for private use than in front of others. Is that right? (The character using it is a native speaker, so I want to be sure I'm not using it incorrectly.)

    Are there any Welsh speakers here who might help me with this? Thank you so much!
    What that dictionary entry means is that carwr is a masculine word and carwyr is its plural form. It's a rather literary word, though, IMHO -- a bit like talking about "a gallant". As Suehil says, the ordinary word is cariad (which is both masc. and fem.), and its plural, should you need it, is cariadon.

    Wynn
     
    Top